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I usually indent the public: and private: access specifiers like this:

class Foo()
{
    private:

    void Bar1() {}

    public:

    void Bar2() {}
}

Xcode doesn't seem to like this, however, so I feel like I'm doing something incorrectly. What is considered common practice for indenting private: and public:?

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closed as not constructive by eduffy, Daniel A. White, Matthieu M., tenfour, Paul R Feb 10 '11 at 17:26

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are they tags?? –  BlackBear Feb 10 '11 at 17:22
    
@BlackBear I wasn't sure what else to call them. –  Maxpm Feb 10 '11 at 17:23
    
I think (I'm not a C++ guy) those are properties –  BlackBear Feb 10 '11 at 17:26
    
Technically, they're "access specifiers". –  Mike Seymour Feb 10 '11 at 17:32
    
@Mike Alright, I'll change the question to reflect that. –  Maxpm Feb 10 '11 at 17:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Religious question :-) You will get many different answers I think.

I say: Which ever you like as long as you are consistent.

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Visual Studio does this:

class Foo()
{
private:

    void Bar1() {}

public:

    void Bar2() {}
}

But I hate it. Many people use it though. If only C++ supported field/method specific visibility modifiers like most languages out there.

I personally like to use this:

class Foo()
{
    private:

        void Bar1() {}

    public:

        void Bar2() {}
}

VS usually keeps reverting it to its indentation scheme, so I often just submit.

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1  
disadvantage is that, when you have nested classes, you indent way too far :/ How do you indent labels? –  Foo Bah Feb 10 '11 at 17:25
    
@Foo Bah: People invented those widescreen monitors for a reason :) And I don't use labels. –  Matěj Zábský Feb 10 '11 at 17:26
1  
+1.Even I hate VS's indentation for public and private –  Fahad Uddin Feb 10 '11 at 17:27
4  
"If only C++ supported field/method specific visibility modifiers" I don't understand your complaint: there is nothing at all keeping you from doing this: private: void Bar1() { } –  James McNellis Feb 10 '11 at 17:46
    
Yeah, but VS will still format it without the last indent. –  Matěj Zábský Feb 10 '11 at 18:01

just like labels:

class Foo()
{
private:

    void Bar1() {}

public:

    void Bar2() {}
}
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I agree, simply because indentation and 80-columns lines don't mix well :) –  Matthieu M. Feb 10 '11 at 17:26
    
@Matthieu M: Because 80 column screens are still in common usage! –  Loki Astari Feb 10 '11 at 17:28
    
@Martin: CLang guidelines have forced 80-columns down my throat ;) I do like being able to compare 2 chunks of code side by side though, so I don't appreciate endless lines, whether 80 or 100 or whatever, this calls for a limit. –  Matthieu M. Feb 10 '11 at 17:31
    
@Martin: I use a 27" iMac :) I also generally have 5-10 files open at once, and it makes life so much easier when i can keep each window width to 80 chars. –  Foo Bah Feb 10 '11 at 17:33

If you want to follow a Style Guide, I suggest the Google C++ Style Guide:

Sections in public, protected and private order, each indented one space.

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8  
But be careful that you only follow the parts of the style guide concerned with code layout, and not those that arbitrarily restrict you to a dysfunctional subset of the language. –  Mike Seymour Feb 10 '11 at 17:38

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