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Before I go messing my database up, I have a quick question:

What is the SQL command to replace a datetime value with another datetime value? I'm going to replace all datetimes in a single column of my database table with '0000-00-00 00:00:00'.

I'm guessing that the SQL command is like this command to replace all string values in a single column/table?:

UPDATE table_name SET field_id = '0000-00-00 00:00:00'

This is my first time replacing all DateTime values like this - YES, I have already made a DB backup, just in case!

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2  
You already have the answer, just run it. –  Dan Grossman Feb 10 '11 at 17:36
    
go ahead ...... –  Framework Feb 10 '11 at 17:37
1  
SQL's one of those "the more you specify, the less you get" situations. If you don't add any kind of 'where' filtering, by default the query will operate on everything. –  Marc B Feb 10 '11 at 17:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An answer to counter Joe's. In short, go for it. Also, you don't need to explicitly write out 00:00:00.

drop table if exists testdt;
create table testdt (dt datetime);
insert testdt select curdate();

update testdt set dt = '0000-00-00';

select * from testdt;

Output:

dt
-------------------
0000-00-00 00:00:00

Note: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/date-and-time-types.html

MySQL also permits you to store '0000-00-00' as a “dummy date” (if you are not using the NO_ZERO_DATE SQL mode). This is in some cases more convenient (and uses less data and index space) than using NULL values.

If you use a date outside the valid range of '1000-01-01' to '9999-12-31', MySQL in all its wisdom will let you store it, and even use it!

drop table if exists testdt;
create table testdt (dt datetime);

insert testdt select curdate();
update testdt set dt = '0000-00-00';

insert testdt select '0010-01-01';
insert testdt select '1010-01-01';
insert testdt select '1000-00-00';
insert testdt select '0000-01-01';
select *, adddate(dt, interval 999 year) from testdt;

Output (the invalid dates with month=day=0 are unusable)

dt                    adddate(dt, interval 999 year)
0000-00-00 00:00:00   NULL
0010-01-01 00:00:00   1009-01-01 00:00:00
1010-01-01 00:00:00   2009-01-01 00:00:00
1000-00-00 00:00:00   NULL
0000-01-01 00:00:00   0999-01-01 00:00:00
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