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After making an abstract superclass, when you get to the first concrete subclass, you've got to implement all your abstract methods, even if some of those methods aren't going to be used in that concrete class. SO! Why doesn't an abstract superclass just make those abstract methods into "fake" methods, like:

public void doThis() { 
     if (1 < 0){ 
          int x = 34
     }
}

it does nothing, since 1 is never less than 0. And then when you get to your concrete subclass, you don't have to implement ALL those abstract methods, but for the ones that you WANT to implement you can just rewrite into a method you need it to be:

public void doThis() {
      //does "this".
}

Both ways would allow for polymorphism, right? So what are the real advantages of abstract methods that I'm missing?

Thanks!

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Btw, are you talking about C++ or java? As far as I'm concerned, in Java, interfaces are almost always a better design than abstract base classes. –  Falmarri Feb 10 '11 at 17:43
3  
@falmarri, i disagree, they are completely different. Note you can use them together. Interfaces are for defining behavior, abstract classes are for providing some functionality but allowing the final details to be filled in later. –  hvgotcodes Feb 10 '11 at 17:45
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

the idea is to enforce a policy that when you use an abstract class:

a) the class that is abstract cannot be instantiated
and
b) you must "fill in the blanks" for how the abstract stuff is done -- in other words, you need to make the abstract stuff concrete.

We don't need these things, but it makes design intent clear, and clean. It reduces errors. If we were to follow your approach, there would be no compile time check to make sure the 'rules' are being followed.

Note that many languages, like javascript, have no notion of 'abstract', and people still write good software with javascript.

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If you're not implementing all of your abstract base class's methods, then there's something wrong with your design.

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not all methods from abstract classes are designed to be overriden. –  chahuistle Feb 10 '11 at 21:44
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Abstract methods protect you from the error of implementing the subclass partially. If the base method is concrete and blank, the compiler will let you get away with reimplementing some virtual, but not others.

There are cases where this is the desired result. But typically it's not.

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There are a couple of things that you are not considering. There are abstract classes and abstract methods. Abstract classes cannot be directly instantiated, they are, so to say, just templates. Abstract methods can only be defined in an abstrac class and must be empty (i.e., no body), but we know all that. However, abstract classes can provide non-abstract methods. A perfect example is Log4j's AppenderSkeleton (see http://logging.apache.org/log4j/1.2/apidocs/org/apache/log4j/AppenderSkeleton.html).

AppenderSkeleton is an abstract class. It has concrete methods that you can override, it has an abstract method (append) that you must implement if you are inheriting (unless your class is also an abstract class), and two methods that come from the Appender interface that also need to be implemented or passed-on as abstract to any child class (close and requireLayout).

Now, if you want to write your own appender to, say, tweet some stuff, you would start by:

public class TweetAppender extends AppenderSkeleton {

    public boolean requiresLayout() {
        return false;
    }

    public void close() {
        // do nothing        
    }

    @Override
    protected void append(LoggingEvent event) {
        // take the message and tweet it!
    }    
}

So, all of the intricacies regarding logging (using filters, setting levels, error handlers) are kept away from you. You just have to do the actual logging and log4j will do the rest for you. Of course, your TweetAppender can override other methods, if you want. Perhaps you want to do special error handling, in this case, you just need you might want to override setErrorHandler.

Now, imagine you also want to implement an appender for Facebook and another one to change your status on Skype. Assume that they all expose an API through Web-Services in order to post status updates, changes, etc. Pretty soon will you realize that there are a couple of things that would be similar, like invoking Web-Services, and so on. Also, you notice that Skype has some format, while Tweeter has another one, and what not. So you wise up and make a WebServiceAppender:

public abstract class WebServiceAppender extends AppenderSkeleton {
    public boolean requiresLayout() {
        return false;
    }

    public final void close() {
        // do extra clean up of resources
    }

    // make this final so no one can do strange stuff
    protected final void append(LoggingEvent event) {
        // do a lot of stuff, like, opening up a connection
        // send an xml, close the connection and stuff...
        // ...
        // ready to send the message!
        final String messageToSend = getFormattedMessage(event);
        // send the message and do lots of complicated stuff
        // ...
        // close and clean up
    }

    // let the implementations decide on the format
    protected abstract String getFormattedMessage(LoggingEvent event); 
}

Now, your TweetAppender would look like

public class TweetAppender extends WebServiceAppender {
    @Override
    protected String getFormattedMessage(LoggingEvent event) {
        // use tweeter's specific format
    }

    public boolean requiresLayout() {
        return super.requiresLayout();
    }
}

By declaring the getFormattedMessage as abstract, WebServiceAppender is forcing any implementation to actually provide an implementation that takes a LoggingEvent and returns a String. Notice also that by declaring the append and close methods as final, WebServiceAppender is prohibiting any implmementation to override those methods. The requireLayout method is still open to be overriden.

Another cool feature of classes inheriting from abstract classes is the use of super. Think of it as the parent class' this. In the case of TweetAppender, the implementation of the requiresLayout method decides to basically defer the responsability of deciding if this appender requires a layout or not by simply using the parent class.

So putting it all together:

public class YourParentClass {
    public void doThis() { 
       if (1 < 0){ 
           int x = 34
    } 
}

public class YourChildClass extends YourParentClass {
    @Override
    public void doThis() {
        // do I want to do this, or something else?
        if (iGuessIWillDoThis) {
            super.doThis();
        } else {
            // do something else
        }
    }
}

Anyway, my two cents.

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It depends on why you need an abstract method in the first place. For example, the Template Method design pattern requires the abstract method to return a value. Obviously, the compiler can't guess what value you want to return.

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