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I have a quick and straighforward question:

I have this simple class:

public class A
{
    public void m(Object o)
    {
      System.out.println("m with Object called");
    }

    public void m(Number n)
    {
       System.out.println("m with Number called");
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
       A a = new A();
       // why will m(Number) be called?
       a.m(null);
    }
}

UPDATE: actually is method with Number actually being called. Sorry about the confusion.

If I call a.m(null) it calls method with Number parameter.

My question is: why is this? where in the java language specification is this specified?

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1  
... because null is not a Number object, thus it falls into the more generalized Object bucket. –  limc Feb 10 '11 at 18:05
5  
that's funny because on my machine (running it on eclipse) it alwways defaults to the Number method –  z - Feb 10 '11 at 18:06
1  
+1 interesting question –  Dani Cricco Feb 10 '11 at 18:29
    
-1 this is overloading, not overriding –  Dani Cricco Feb 10 '11 at 18:29
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6 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

First of all, it actually calls m(Number).

It happens because both methods are applicable, but m(Number) is the most specific method, since any argument of m(Number) can be passed to m(Object), but not vice versa.

If you replace m(Object) by m(String) (or add another method such as m(Date)), compiler would report ambiguity, since the most specific method can't be identified.

See the section Choosing the Most Specific Method in the Java Specification.

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2  
ok, now that I've actually run the example code, I see this too. It also makes sense that once I added m(Date n){...} that I got an error: "method m(Object) is ambiguous for the type" –  David Feb 10 '11 at 18:16
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  1. This is not polymorphism or overriding. This is method overloading.
  2. I tested this and specific method is being called (not the m(Object)) and according to the spec the specific method is always called. Which overload will get selected for null in Java?
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2  
+1 for noting the difference between overriding and overloading –  Goran Jovic Feb 10 '11 at 18:24
    
+1 for highlighting that this is overloading –  Dani Cricco Feb 10 '11 at 18:28
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another related question for you to think about:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
   A a = new A();
   Object n = new Integer(1);
   a.m(n); // which method will be called?
}
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My 2 cents. Method with Number argument is the one that is called, Because Number extends Object. I had a similar situation in the past, I did override a method and put Component instead of JComponent (by mistake). It took me one week to find out the reason why my method was never called. I figure it out, that if there are some inheritance relationship between the overloaded methods, the JVM matches first the deeper one in the class hierarchy.

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Object is the default type in Java. If you refactor your m(Object o) method to m(String o) you'll have a compile time error saying that the call m(null) is ambiguous because Java cannot determine which class between String and Number defaults to null

Other than that, between m(Object o) and m(Number o), calling m(null) will call m(Number o) because it's the most specialized method. You would need to cast null into an Object (or anything not an instance of Number) otherwise.

a.m((String) null);
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null has no type and it calles m(Number) –  Pangea Feb 10 '11 at 18:23
    
well... formally there is a null type, and it's a subtype of all reference types. pretty weird. –  irreputable Feb 10 '11 at 18:41
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Jaguar, According to the Java Specifications, yes, it is an object. So the method chosen for a.m(true) in the main resorts to the Object parameter type.

Boolean is defined in Java.lang.Boolean Number is defined in Java.lang.Number

(Both extend object)

Coders Rhyme book : "When in vex, reference the specs"

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