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I came across the following puzzle somewhere

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    {

        /*Fill in something here to make this code compile  
           ........... 
         */   
        ooOoO+=a;    
    } 
    #undef ooOoO 
    printf("%d",ooOoO); 

    return 0;
}

In short I want to ask how can I use ooOoO in printf after it has been #undef ed?

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2  
You have two opening braces after main(); is that intended? –  James McNellis Feb 10 '11 at 18:28
    
I think it is. That one makes the puzzle even interesting. –  Atmocreations Feb 10 '11 at 20:37
    
@James It's intended, and prevents trivial solutions like that of VJo below. –  Jim Balter Feb 11 '11 at 5:12
    
@Jim: Since a block can be empty, it doesn't really add anything to the problem: any solution would just need to start with a closing brace. –  James McNellis Feb 11 '11 at 5:19
    
@James Thanks, you're right, adding a } to VJo's "trivial" solution would be a "trivial" modification. Sorry for the brainfart. –  Jim Balter Feb 11 '11 at 5:36

5 Answers 5

You need to declare it as a variable:

#define ooOoO int ooOoO = 42; int a = 1; { ooOoO

Macro-replacement is non-recursive; while ooOoO is being replaced, the identifier ooOoO will not be treated as a macro name.


If you are looking for a solution that does not use a macro, then you can simply ignore the #undef directive and never declare ooOoO as a macro. It is permitted in both C and C++ to #undef an identifier that is not defined as a macro.

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why the opening bracket? There number of opening brackets in the OPs question matches the number of closing brackets. Am I missing something? –  Atmocreations Feb 10 '11 at 20:27
    
@Atmoscreations: I assumed (perhaps incorrectly) that the second left brace following main() was a typo; if it isn't, then the block it introduces would need to be closed anyway before declaring ooOoO as a variable, otherwise it would not be in scope when the printf statement is reached. –  James McNellis Feb 10 '11 at 20:29
    
I think the bracket is intended... But you're right. This causes the variable to be out of scope otherwise. –  Atmocreations Feb 10 '11 at 20:42
#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
{

      /*Fill in something here to make this code compile  

*/
}
int a = 0, ooOoO=0;
#define ooOoO ooOoO
{
/*
      */   
              ooOoO+=a;    
          } 
          #undef ooOoO 
          printf("%d",ooOoO); 

return 0;
}
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you seem to miss that there's a } missing at the end and therefore doesn't compile. –  Atmocreations Feb 10 '11 at 20:36

How about this?

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    int ooOoO = 0;
    {
        int a = 3;
        ooOoO+=a;
    }
    #undef ooOoO
    printf("%d",ooOoO);

    return 0;
}
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1  
the second opening bracket is missing after main. doesn't match the question though –  Atmocreations Feb 10 '11 at 20:36

The #undef undefines the symbol to the preprocessor so that it does not get substituted with something else, but ooOoO still gets to the compiler.

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Of course, but how did ooOoO get defined within scope? That's what the other answers provide. –  Jim Balter Feb 11 '11 at 5:15
    
Sure, but this was explicitly asked. James McNeils gave the solution but only explained this in an edit after I posted (and I cannot comment yet). –  TomasG Feb 11 '11 at 12:03

After reformatting the code (indent) and adding the solution, that's what I receive:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    {
/*-Insert starts here-*/
    }
    int ooOoO = 0, a=3;
    {
/*-Insert ends here-*/
        ooOoO+=a;      
    }       
    #undef ooOoO 
    printf("%d",ooOoO);       
    return 0;
}

compiles and prints 3

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