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Hey. I have some problems writing char to a file with ofstream. this is how the code looks (Just to show how it works. This is NOT the real code).

char buffer[5001];
char secondbuffer[5001];
char temp;
ifstream in(Filename here);
int i = 0;
while(in.get(secondbuffer) && !in.eof[])
{
i++;
}
for(int j = 0; j < i; j++)
{
secondbuffer[j] = buffer[j];
}
ofstream fout(somefile);
fout << secondbuffer;

// end of program 

The problem is that it reads the characters of the first file fine, but when it writes to the second file, it adds all characters from the first file, as its supposed to do, but when there are no more characters, it adds a lot of "Ì" characters in the end of file.

fx:

file 1: abc

file 2: abcÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌ...

How can I prevent the program save "Ì" in the file?

EDIT2:

int i = 0;
    lenghtofFile++;
    while(fin.get(firstfileBuffer[i]) && !fin.eof())
    {
        i++;
        lenghtofFile++;
    }
    firstfileBuffer[i] = '\0';

    for(int j = 0; j < lenghtofFile; j++)
    {

        if(secondfileBuffer[j] != ' ' && secondfileBuffer[j] != '\0')
        {
        secondfileBuffer[j] = function(key, firstfileBuffer[j]);
        }

    }

    secondfileBuffer[lenghtofFile]='\0';

    fout << secondfileBuffer;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to null-terminate secondbuffer. You are adding all the characters read from the stream, which do not include the trailing NULL.

on the line before fout, add

secondbuffer[j]='\0\';
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please check out my edit? I still have the problem. (I know the code is very bad, but I'm not good at programming. I hope you understand ) –  Janman Feb 10 '11 at 20:12
    
The problem now is that jj = lengthoffile-1. You need it to be == lengthoffile. (Actually, since you are now null terminating firstfileBuffer) you can just do lengthoffile++; before the copy loop. This will ensure the null is copied. Then you can get rid of the jj altogether. –  AShelly Feb 10 '11 at 20:15
    
Can you please check out my edited edit? (:D) I does still not work. –  Janman Feb 10 '11 at 20:33
    
@Janam: I feel you should try using in::getline, rather than in::get. –  ajmartin Feb 10 '11 at 20:43

This should work fine:

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
  char buffer[5001];
  char secondbuffer[5001];
  ifstream in("foo.txt", ifstream::in);
  ofstream fout("blah_copy.txt");
  do
    {
      in.getline(buffer,5001);
      fout<<buffer;
    }
  while(!in.eof());
  in.close();
  fout.close();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
THanks for the answer. Right now I cant edit my code, but I'll rewrite it. –  Janman Feb 11 '11 at 7:08

The problem is that there is no terminating null character in your file. When you read the file in, you get "abc" just fine, but the garbage that was sitting in secondbuffer when it was declared is still there, so writing "abc" to the beginning of it means that you have a 5001-length array of garbage that starts with "abc."

Try adding

secondbuffer[i] = '\0'; after your for loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please check out my edit? I still have the problem. (I know the code is very bad, but I'm not good at programming. I hope you understand ) –  Janman Feb 10 '11 at 20:10

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