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Currently, I have something like this:-

public class MyHolder<T> {
    private T   value;

    public MyHolder(T t) {
        this.value = t;
    }

    public T getValue() {
        return first;
    }

    public void setValue(T t) {
        this.first = t;
    }
}

With this, I can use it like this:-

MyBean bean = new MyBean();
MyHolder<MyBean> obj = new MyHolder<MyBean>(bean);
obj.getValue(); // returns bean

Instead of calling the getter/setter to be getValue() and setValue(..), is it possible to "generify" that too?

Essentially, it would be nice to have it getMyBean() and setMyBean(..), depending on the type passed in. Granted this is a very simple example, however if I create a generic holder class that takes N generic properties, then it would be nice to call it something meaningful instead of getValue1() or getValue2(), and so on.

Thanks.

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1  
You shouldn't create a generic holder class that takes N generic properties. Make an actual class with a useful name and useful field names. –  ColinD Feb 10 '11 at 21:00
1  
I'm quite sure it couldn't be used the way you'd like, even if it was possible. –  maaartinus Feb 10 '11 at 21:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. There is no such feature in Java. I can't even imagine how it would look syntactically... void set<T>();? And how would the getter / setter for for instance MyHolder<? extends Number> look?

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No, it's not possible unless you use some kind of source code generator to have the MyHolder class generated based on your input.

But on the other hand, even if you had this possibility, how it would be different from using a Map<String, T>? So the invocation would read:

MyBean bean = new MyBean();
MyHolder<MyBean> obj = new MyHolder<MyBean>(bean);
obj.get('value');
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No, not possible. Java generics are based on type erasure, i.e. it's mostly syntactic sugar provided by the compiler. That means each generic class is actually implemented by a "raw type" where are type parameters are Object and which already contains all the methods. So it's fundamentally not possible to have different methods depending on type parameters.

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1  
I wouldn't say erasures have to do with it. If there was a syntax for it, the compiler could derive such method names. It's simply just not supported. –  aioobe Feb 10 '11 at 20:57
1  
I don't think erasure precludes this since it could be an entirely compile-time thing that's reduced to the original method name for runtime purposes. Not to say that there aren't a ton of other problems with the idea. –  ColinD Feb 10 '11 at 20:59
1  
Erasures has a bit to do with it - you'd have a method getMyBean in the source code and what in compiled code? With getValue it wouldn't compile. So you'd have to put getMyBean there, which is reified and not erasure. –  maaartinus Feb 10 '11 at 21:05
1  
In the compiled code, you would obviously have a method called getMyBean. –  aioobe Feb 10 '11 at 21:07

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