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At the heart of an application (written in Python and using NumPy) I need to rotate a 4th order tensor. Actually, I need to rotate a lot of tensors many times and this is my bottleneck. My naive implementation (below) involving eight nested loops seems to be quite slow, but I cannot see a way to leverage NumPy's matrix operations and, hopefully, speed things up. I've a feeling I should be using np.tensordot, but I don't see how.

Mathematically, elements of the rotated tensor, T', are given by: T'ijkl = Σ gia gjb gkc gld Tabcd with the sum being over the repeated indices on the right hand side. T and Tprime are 3*3*3*3 NumPy arrays and the rotation matrix g is a 3*3 NumPy array. My slow implementation (taking ~0.04 seconds per call) is below.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import numpy as np

def rotT(T, g):
    Tprime = np.zeros((3,3,3,3))
    for i in range(3):
        for j in range(3):
            for k in range(3):
                for l in range(3):
                    for ii in range(3):
                        for jj in range(3):
                            for kk in range(3):
                                for ll in range(3):
                                    gg = g[ii,i]*g[jj,j]*g[kk,k]*g[ll,l]
                                    Tprime[i,j,k,l] = Tprime[i,j,k,l] + \
                                         gg*T[ii,jj,kk,ll]
    return Tprime

if __name__ == "__main__":

    T = np.array([[[[  4.66533067e+01,  5.84985000e-02, -5.37671310e-01],
                    [  5.84985000e-02,  1.56722231e+01,  2.32831900e-02],
                    [ -5.37671310e-01,  2.32831900e-02,  1.33399259e+01]],
                   [[  4.60051700e-02,  1.54658176e+01,  2.19568200e-02],
                    [  1.54658176e+01, -5.18223500e-02, -1.52814920e-01],
                    [  2.19568200e-02, -1.52814920e-01, -2.43874100e-02]],
                   [[ -5.35577630e-01,  1.95558600e-02,  1.31108757e+01],
                    [  1.95558600e-02, -1.51342210e-01, -6.67615000e-03],
                    [  1.31108757e+01, -6.67615000e-03,  6.90486240e-01]]],
                  [[[  4.60051700e-02,  1.54658176e+01,  2.19568200e-02],
                    [  1.54658176e+01, -5.18223500e-02, -1.52814920e-01],
                    [  2.19568200e-02, -1.52814920e-01, -2.43874100e-02]],
                   [[  1.57414726e+01, -3.86167500e-02, -1.55971950e-01],
                    [ -3.86167500e-02,  4.65601977e+01, -3.57741000e-02],
                    [ -1.55971950e-01, -3.57741000e-02,  1.34215636e+01]],
                   [[  2.58256300e-02, -1.49072770e-01, -7.38843000e-03],
                    [ -1.49072770e-01, -3.63410500e-02,  1.32039847e+01],
                    [ -7.38843000e-03,  1.32039847e+01,  1.38172700e-02]]],
                  [[[ -5.35577630e-01,  1.95558600e-02,  1.31108757e+01],
                    [  1.95558600e-02, -1.51342210e-01, -6.67615000e-03],
                    [  1.31108757e+01, -6.67615000e-03,  6.90486240e-01]],
                   [[  2.58256300e-02, -1.49072770e-01, -7.38843000e-03],
                    [ -1.49072770e-01, -3.63410500e-02,  1.32039847e+01],
                    [ -7.38843000e-03,  1.32039847e+01,  1.38172700e-02]],
                   [[  1.33639532e+01, -1.26331100e-02,  6.84650400e-01],
                    [ -1.26331100e-02,  1.34222177e+01,  1.67851800e-02],
                    [  6.84650400e-01,  1.67851800e-02,  4.89151396e+01]]]])

    g = np.array([[ 0.79389393,  0.54184237,  0.27593346],
                  [-0.59925749,  0.62028664,  0.50609776],
                  [ 0.10306737, -0.56714313,  0.8171449 ]])

    for i in range(100):
        Tprime = rotT(T,g)

Is there a way to make this go faster? Making the code generalise to other ranks of tensor would be useful, but is less important.

share|improve this question
10  
Gack! This is why 3 dimensions ought to be enough for anybody! ;) –  sizzzzlerz Feb 10 '11 at 21:13
1  
If all else fails, you could use Cython. It supposedly plays well with numpy. –  delnan Feb 10 '11 at 21:17
8  
upvoted for wtf factor –  mkoryak Feb 10 '11 at 21:20
5  
There is definitely a way to do it without a single loop. I'm about to figure it out, but I'm struggling to wrap my head around NumPy-broadcasting in eight dimensions... :) –  Sven Marnach Feb 10 '11 at 21:24
3  
@Andrew: Please accept Philipp's solution -- it's far better than mine :) –  Sven Marnach Feb 10 '11 at 22:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 36 down vote accepted

To use tensordot, compute the outer product of the g tensors:

def rotT(T, g):
    gg = np.outer(g, g)
    gggg = np.outer(gg, gg).reshape(4 * g.shape)
    axes = ((0, 2, 4, 6), (0, 1, 2, 3))
    return np.tensordot(gggg, T, axes)

On my system, this is around seven times faster than Sven's solution. If the g tensor doesn't change often, you can also cache the gggg tensor. If you do this and turn on some micro-optimizations (inlining the tensordot code, no checks, no generic shapes), you can still make it two times faster:

def rotT(T, gggg):
    return np.dot(gggg.transpose((1, 3, 5, 7, 0, 2, 4, 6)).reshape((81, 81)),
                  T.reshape(81, 1)).reshape((3, 3, 3, 3))

Results of timeit on my home laptop (500 iterations):

Your original code: 19.471129179
Sven's code: 0.718412876129
My first code: 0.118047952652
My second code: 0.0690279006958

The numbers on my work machine are:

Your original code: 9.77922987938
Sven's code: 0.137110948563
My first code: 0.0569641590118
My second code: 0.0308079719543
share|improve this answer
4  
Gotta love the 150x speedups! –  mtrw Feb 10 '11 at 23:02
    
btw, cython version is 4 times faster than the first code stackoverflow.com/questions/4962606/… –  J.F. Sebastian Feb 11 '11 at 19:56
2  
@mtrw: in my limited math it looks more like 325x –  NotMe Feb 11 '11 at 22:50

Here is how to do it with a single Python loop:

def rotT(T, g):
    Tprime = T
    for i in range(4):
        slices = [None] * 4
        slices[i] = slice(None)
        slices *= 2
        Tprime = g[slices].T * Tprime
    return Tprime.sum(-1).sum(-1).sum(-1).sum(-1)

Admittedly, this is a bit hard to grasp at first glance, but it's quite a bit faster :)

share|improve this answer
3  
That's more than 20 times faster, and gives the same result. –  Andrew Walker Feb 10 '11 at 21:35
5  
+1 for math awesomeness and for yet another proof that algorithmic optimizations beat microoptimizations by orders of magnitude. –  delnan Feb 10 '11 at 21:38
2  
Quite nice! +1 Along those lines, there's a function that may be included in future versions of numpy that would also fit the OP's purpose... numpy.einsum (It's not there yet). See this discussion on numpy-discussion: mail-archive.com/numpy-discussion@scipy.org/msg29680.html –  Joe Kington Feb 10 '11 at 21:40
3  
No idea what you just done but if it outputs the same as the above, you've got my +1. (Can I tag this question voodoo?) –  Trufa Feb 10 '11 at 22:44

Thanks to hard work by M. Wiebe, the next version of Numpy (which will probably be 1.6) is going to make this even easier:

>>> Trot = np.einsum('ai,bj,ck,dl,abcd->ijkl', g, g, g, g, T)

Philipp's approach is at the moment 3x faster, though, but perhaps there is some room for improvement. The speed difference is probably mostly due to tensordot being able to unroll the whole operation as a single matrix product that can be passed on to BLAS, and so avoiding much of the overhead associated with small arrays --- this is not possible for general Einstein summation, as not all operations that can be expressed in this form resolve to a single matrix product.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: awesome function — a swiss-knife of Tensor Calculus –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 1 '11 at 23:18

Out of curiosity I've compared Cython implementation of a naive code from the question with the numpy code from @Philipp's answer. Cython code is four times faster on my machine:

#cython: boundscheck=False, wraparound=False
import numpy as np
cimport numpy as np

def rotT(np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=4] T,
         np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=2] g):
    cdef np.ndarray[np.float64_t, ndim=4] Tprime
    cdef Py_ssize_t i, j, k, l, ii, jj, kk, ll
    cdef np.float64_t gg

    Tprime = np.zeros((3,3,3,3), dtype=T.dtype)
    for i in range(3):
        for j in range(3):
            for k in range(3):
                for l in range(3):
                    for ii in range(3):
                        for jj in range(3):
                            for kk in range(3):
                                for ll in range(3):
                                    gg = g[ii,i]*g[jj,j]*g[kk,k]*g[ll,l]
                                    Tprime[i,j,k,l] = Tprime[i,j,k,l] + \
                                         gg*T[ii,jj,kk,ll]
    return Tprime
share|improve this answer
    
Good to know and thanks for the data. The speedup from any of these methods is enough to shift my bottleneck elsewhere. –  Andrew Walker Feb 11 '11 at 22:19

I thought I'd contribute a relatively new data point to these benchmarks, using parakeet, one of the numpy-aware JIT compilers that's sprung up in the past few months. (The other one I'm aware of is numba, but I didn't test it here.)

After you make it through the somewhat labyrinthine installation process for LLVM, you can decorate many pure-numpy functions to (often) speed up their performance :

import numpy as np
import parakeet

@parakeet.jit
def rotT(T, g):
    # ...

I only tried applying the JIT to Andrew's code in the original question, but it does pretty well (> 10x speedup) for not having to write any new code whatsoever :

andrew      10 loops, best of 3: 206 msec per loop
andrew_jit  10 loops, best of 3: 13.3 msec per loop
sven        100 loops, best of 3: 2.39 msec per loop
philipp     1000 loops, best of 3: 0.879 msec per loop

For these timings (on my laptop) I ran each function ten times, to give the JIT a chance to identify and optimize the hot code paths.

Interestingly, Sven and Philipp's suggestions are still orders of magnitude faster !

share|improve this answer
3  
I'm late in joining this conversation, but I just wanted to point out that these methods scale differently with the size of the data. When I change the tensors from being 3x3x3x3 to 7x7x7x7 then Parakeet and Numba both take ~10ms on my machine, but Phillip's first solution takes ~80ms. –  Alex Rubinsteyn Nov 25 '13 at 1:37
    
have you tried to compare it with the cython implementation of the naive code from the original question? –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 8 '14 at 23:34

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