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I have this fragment of Javascript. I need the variable highest_number later in the function and I can it generate fine. The problem is that highest_number seems to be unaccessable once the for loop ends (e.g after the closing } ).

function new_route(parts) {
    var highest_number = -1;

    alert(parts);
    if (parts[0] == "field") {} 
    else if (parts[0] == "option") {
        //find last option input id
        var select_container = "container_" + parts[2];
        var thisContainer = document.getElementById(select_container);
        var optionsList = thisContainer.getElementsByTagName("input");

        for (var i = 0; i < optionsList.length; i++) {
            var option_parts = optionsList[i].getAttribute("id").split("_");

            if (option_parts[0] == "option") {
                alert(option_parts);
                if (option_parts[2] > highest_number) {
                    highest_number = option_parts[2];
                }
            }
        }
        alert(highest_number);

        var labelNode = document.createElement("label");
        var inputNode = document.createElement("input");
    }
}

Why is this happening?

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2  
can you show full function code? –  Tom Tu Feb 10 '11 at 21:13
2  
It works for me: jsfiddle.net/peenU –  JCOC611 Feb 10 '11 at 21:14
    
Exactly what is shown in your Alert box? Did you misspell highest_number at some point? Did you try a debugger such as Firebug? –  Larry K Feb 10 '11 at 21:15
    
the alert box never shows up, which implies the syntex is broken somewhere, but I can alert successfully anywhere above where it is at the moment. Firebug isn't returning anything helpful. And the page validates as html5. –  YsoL8 Feb 10 '11 at 21:18
    
@Ysol8 Chrome JS debugger. Ysol8 with starting to use it? –  bzlm Feb 10 '11 at 21:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You didn't provide all relevant information in the question, so I'm working from your question from the other day.

At least part of the issue is with getElementsByTagName('input') because it is including the submit button which doesn't have an ID.

So when you get to:

var option_parts = optionsList[i].getAttribute("id").split("_");

You're trying to do a .split() on null.

If you exclude elements in the loop that don't have an ID, it will work:

    for (var i = 0; i < optionsList.length; i++) {
             // if no ID, continue to the next item
        if( !optionsList[i].id ) continue;
        var option_parts = optionsList[i].getAttribute("id").split("_");

Side note. Please include relevant information in the question. It saves everyone time.

Here's a jsFiddle of your code in action. It is updated from the fiddle I posted before. You may want to utilize it if you have future questions regarding this code.

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+1 on finding out more info from OP's prior Q's! Nice bit of sleuthing. –  Larry K Feb 10 '11 at 21:34
    
@Larry K: Thanks, but to be completely honest it was fresh in my memory since I worked on it then too. Same issue, there wasn't enough information in the question. Once the code was posted, the issue was clear. :o) –  user113716 Feb 10 '11 at 21:35
1  
Very nice catch! Had no idea JavaScript reacts like that to null vaules. Assumed it did the php thing and ignored them. Also, will include html in future JS questions. JSFiddle is going in my bookmarks. –  YsoL8 Feb 10 '11 at 21:40
    
@patrick dw you'll notice that the fiddle exhibits the strings-vs-integers problem I described - try changing the "_7_1" elements so that their keys end with "_7_14", and you'll see that the loop still thinks "2" is the biggest number. –  Pointy Feb 10 '11 at 21:47
    
@Pointy: I don't doubt that at all, but it wasn't the cause of the failure in the loop. Good catch on that bug though. +1 fer ya. –  user113716 Feb 10 '11 at 21:49

Execution will stop if a named element is searched for but can't be found. Double check (use alerts) that the right element id is being searched for using document.getElementById

  var thisContainer = document.getElementById (select_container);

Check that select_container is what you expect.

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The alert box is in the arm of the else statement. Try moving it to the real end of the function

function new_route (parts) {
  var highest_number = -1;

  alert (parts);
  if (parts[0] == "field") {
    } else if (parts[0] == "option") {
      //find last option input id
      var select_container = "container_"+parts[2];
      var thisContainer = document.getElementById (select_container);
      var optionsList = thisContainer.getElementsByTagName ("input");

      for (var i = 0; i< optionsList.length; i++) {
        var option_parts = optionsList[i].getAttribute("id").split("_");

        if (option_parts[0] == "option") {
          alert (option_parts);
          if (option_parts[2] > highest_number) {
            highest_number = option_parts[2];
          }
        }
      }
      alert (highest_number);

      var labelNode = document.createElement ("label");
      var inputNode = document.createElement ("input");
    }
    alert (highest_number); // Add Alert here!
  }
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it could be the cause, but the other bug I note in my answer should probably be fixed too :-) –  Pointy Feb 10 '11 at 21:24
    
good thought, but it didn't help. –  YsoL8 Feb 10 '11 at 21:27

When you get the "option_parts", you're getting an array of strings. You should make sure that you explicitly convert to integer there (well, to numbers). The comparison will be done as a numeric comparison on the first iteration, but as soon as you set "highest_number" to "option_parts[2]", then it'll be a string too.

What you could do is this:

   // ...
   var option_parts = optionsList[i].getAttribute("id").split("_");
   if (option_parts[0] === "option") {
     var index = parseInt(option_parts[2], 10); //  <----- the important thing
     if (index > highest_number)
       highest_number = index;
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't "3" > 2 work in all JS implementations? –  bzlm Feb 10 '11 at 21:19
    
by typecasting? ...ah! –  YsoL8 Feb 10 '11 at 21:19
    
@bzlm yes, "3" > 2 works. However, what happens if the comparison is true? Then "highest_number" is set to be equal to the string value "3", not the numeric value 3. Thus, the rest of the comparisons will be carried out as string to string comparisons. –  Pointy Feb 10 '11 at 21:20
    
@Pointy ...which work too ("3" > "2"). So what's the problem? :) –  bzlm Feb 10 '11 at 21:21
1  
@YsoL8 you're probably going to need to fix this at some point anyway. –  Pointy Feb 10 '11 at 21:44

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