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How do I sort a list of indices by what they're pointing to in python?

I have

 indices = list(range(len(mylist)))

I want to sort the indices so that if a precedes b in indices then mylist[a] > mylist[b].

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indicies.sort(lambda x,y:mylist[x]-mylist[y])
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Do I need to import something to get sort to work? – Neil G Feb 10 '11 at 22:34
    
See my edit, sorry. Sort is a list function – dfb Feb 10 '11 at 22:38
    
Also, what if mylist is a list of numpy floats? Then, I need an integer-returning sign function. Is int(numpy.sign(...)) the best I can do? – Neil G Feb 10 '11 at 22:38
    
@spinthebloack, thanks, that worked. – Neil G Feb 10 '11 at 22:38
2  
This worked: indices.sort(key = lambda x:mylist[x], reverse = True) – Neil G Feb 10 '11 at 22:57

Also, let me add the following snippet as an answer, using the information provided in your original question...

I want to sort the indices so that if a precedes b in indices then mylist[a] > mylist[b].

...and the additional info you have in your comment

Also, what if mylist is a list of numpy floats?

Then you can simply do:

In [2]: import numpy

In [3]: a = numpy.asarray([-1, 2.73, 15.827, -8.48, 9, 13, 15, 3.22, 0, -1, 1])

In [4]: indices = a.argsort()[::-1]
Out[4]: array([ 2,  6,  5,  4,  7,  1, 10,  8,  9,  0,  3])

In [5]: a[indices]
Out[5]: 
array([ 15.827,  15.   ,  13.   ,   9.   ,   3.22 ,   2.73 ,   1.   ,
     0.   ,  -1.   ,  -1.   ,  -8.48 ])
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Interesting, thanks! – Neil G Feb 11 '11 at 0:39
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Python 2.6+, most elegant answer:

indices.sort(key = lambda x:mylist[x], reverse = True)
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