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I'm doing some statistics work, I have a (large) collection of random numbers to compute the mean of, I'd like to work with generators, because I just need to compute the mean, so I don't need to store the numbers.

The problem is that numpy.mean breaks if you pass it a generator. I can write a simple function to do what I want, but I'm wondering if there's a proper, built-in way to do this?

It would be nice if I could say "sum(values)/len(values)", but len doesn't work for genetators, and sum already consumed values.

here's an example:

import numpy 

def my_mean(values):
    n = 0
    Sum = 0.0
    try:
        while True:
            Sum += next(values)
            n += 1
    except StopIteration: pass
    return float(Sum)/n

X = [k for k in range(1,7)]
Y = (k for k in range(1,7))

print numpy.mean(X)
print my_mean(Y)

these both give the same, correct, answer, buy my_mean doesn't work for lists, and numpy.mean doesn't work for generators.

I really like the idea of working with generators, but details like this seem to spoil things.

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2  
You'd know how many random numbers your generator would produce, wouldn't you? –  Sven Marnach Feb 10 '11 at 23:15
    
@Sven Marnach: suppose the generator is reading from a file? –  Jimmy Feb 10 '11 at 23:22
1  
If you really want to not store the data (and not implement your own slower sum function) You could create a counting generator and call it like this: co = countingGen(); mean = sum(co(data))/co.getCount() –  Thomas Ahle Feb 10 '11 at 23:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just one simple change to your code would let you use both. Generators were meant to be used interchangeably to lists in a for-loop.

def my_mean(values):
    n = 0
    Sum = 0.0
    for v in values:
        Sum += v
        n += 1
    return Sum / n
share|improve this answer
    
Capital letters such as in Sum are usually reserved for classes. –  xApple Sep 5 '13 at 12:36
    
@xApple, I tried to make this similar to the code in the question; you'll see that the variable is named Sum there as well. Personally I would have followed the convention in PEP 8. –  Mark Ransom Sep 5 '13 at 13:27

The old-fashioned way to do it:

def my_mean(values):
   sum, n = 0, 0
   for x in values:
      sum += x
      n += 1
   return float(sum)/n
share|improve this answer
def my_mean(values):
    total = 0
    for n, v in enumerate(values, 1):
        total += v
    return total / n

print my_mean(X)
print my_mean(Y)

There is statistics.mean() in Python 3.4 but it calls list() on the input:

def mean(data):
    if iter(data) is data:
        data = list(data)
    n = len(data)
    if n < 1:
        raise StatisticsError('mean requires at least one data point')
    return _sum(data)/n

where _sum() returns an accurate sum (math.fsum()-like function that in addition to float also supports Fraction, Decimal).

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One way would be

numpy.fromiter(Y, int).mean()

but this actually temporarily stores the numbers.

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Your approach is a good one, but you should instead use the for x in y idiom instead of repeatedly calling next until you get a StopIteration. This works for both lists and generators:

def my_mean(values):
    n = 0
    Sum = 0.0

    for value in values:
        Sum += value
        n += 1
    return float(Sum)/n
share|improve this answer
    
Capital letters such as in Sum are usually reserved for classes. –  xApple Sep 5 '13 at 12:35
def my_mean(values):
    n = 0
    sum = 0
    for v in values:
        sum += v
        n += 1
    return sum/n

The above is very similar to your code, except by using for to iterate values you are good no matter if you get a list or an iterator. The python sum method is however very optimized, so unless the list is really, really long, you might be more happy temporarily storing the data.

(Also notice that since you are using python3, you don't need float(sum)/n)

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By doing sum = 0 you are masking builtin functions. –  xApple Sep 5 '13 at 12:35

Try:

import itertools

def mean(i):
    (i1, i2) = itertools.tee(i, 2)
    return sum(i1) / sum(1 for _ in i2)

print mean([1,2,3,4,5])

tee will duplicate your iterator for any iterable i (e.g. a generator, a list, etc.), allowing you to use one duplicate for summing and the other for counting.

(Note that 'tee' will still use intermediate storage).

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2  
This temporarily stores the whole list. Memory-wise, it's equivalent to converting to a list first and the using sum(a)/len(a), but using a list would be faster. –  Sven Marnach Feb 10 '11 at 23:19
    
Good point, true -- I was just looking at how tee() is implemented. I hate it when that happens. :-) –  payne Feb 10 '11 at 23:21
    
You would think that tee could be implemented by only storing the "diff" between the cloned iterators, i.e. the elements that one has consumed but the other has not yet. –  Ryan Thompson Feb 24 '12 at 22:08

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