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I'm trying to write a multi-threaded program, the number of threads based on command-line input, and so I can't hard-code pre-declared threads. Is this a valid way of doing it?

int threads = 5; // (dynamic, not hard-coded)
int i = 0;
pthread_t * thread = malloc(sizeof(pthread_t)*threads);

for (i = 0; i < threads; i++) {
    pthread_t foobar;
    thread[i] = foobar; // will this cause a conflict?
}

for (i = 0; i < threads; i++) {

    int ret = pthread_create(&thread[i], NULL, (void *)&foobar_function, NULL);

    if(ret != 0) {
        printf ("Create pthread error!\n");
        exit (1);
    }
}

Here's my result from modifications suggested below. Seems to work just fine.

int threads = 5;
int i;

pthread_t * thread = malloc(sizeof(pthread_t)*threads);

for (i = 0; i < threads; i++) {

    int ret = pthread_create(&thread[i], NULL, &foobar_function, NULL);

    if(ret != 0) {
        printf ("Create pthread error!\n");
        exit (1);
    }
    // pthread_join(thread[i], NULL); // don't actually want this here :)
}

sleep(1);     // main() will probably finish before your threads do,
free(thread); // so we'll sleep for illustrative purposes
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2  
you can't just assign an integer to a string in the int threads = argv[3] bit. You have to use atoi or sscanf –  Simon Walker Feb 11 '11 at 0:22
    
thanks, you're right. fixed. –  Brian D Feb 11 '11 at 0:35
    
Well, with pthread_join() being where it is, you shall create the thread, and then wait for it to finish before spawning the next one. So in fact you'll be quasi single-threaded here:) –  user332325 Feb 11 '11 at 0:38
    
When I run it without the join, it don't think it executes the function... (I made foobar_function just print out a quick line of text). Am I missing a step? .. EDIT Actually, I guess it is working.. sometimes it prints out the text, but most of the time it doesn't :P. –  Brian D Feb 11 '11 at 0:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What's in the first cycle? Does it set the array elements to uninitialized value?

So i think that's what you need:

int threads = 5, i = 0, ret = -1;

pthread_t * thread = malloc(sizeof(pthread_t)*threads);

for (i = 0; i < threads; i++) {

    ret = pthread_create(&thread[i], NULL, &foobar_function, NULL);

    if(ret != 0) {
        printf ("Create pthread error!\n");
        exit (1);
    }
}

It spawns threads threads, starting foobar_function in each. And you have (if everything goes well:)) their ids in thread array. So for example you can cancel second thread by calling pthread_cancel(thread[1]) etc.

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@Brian D: The function for the thread you specify as a third parameter to pthread_create(). –  user332325 Feb 11 '11 at 0:08
    
Yes, I believe that's what I'm trying to do. In the example I'm following, since it's a static number of pthreads, they just write pthread_t t1; and pthread_t t2; and then initialize them after with two different functions, so I'm trying to figure out how to dynamically make n threads. –  Brian D Feb 11 '11 at 0:09
    
@Brian D: So just skip that part (as pthread_t's nature is unknown, one cannot set it to any kind of undefined). You get the threads' ids (and start the threads too) in the second cycle. –  user332325 Feb 11 '11 at 0:13
    
I don't understand fully.. can you give me an example? –  Brian D Feb 11 '11 at 0:22
    
Perfect. Thank you! –  Brian D Feb 11 '11 at 0:36

The first for loop is not valid C, and I'm not sure what you want it to do. Just remove it and the rest of the code looks ok, aside from the incorrect cast on foobar_function. The cast should be:

(void *(*)(void *))foobar_function

but unless the type is already this, or something very close, your program probably has undefined behavior. It would be better to fix the function signature so no cast is needed.

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yeah, you're right, Thanks. –  Brian D Feb 11 '11 at 0:31

If you're trying to write a multithreaded program, but don't understand how to allocate a dynamically sized data structure, you may be doing things wrong.

Learn to walk before you run.

Consider using an easier language, and avoiding the use of (explicit) threads.

Threads are very difficult to use correctly; dynamically sized arrays are very easy to achieve (even fairly easy in C)

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There's little choice in language or use of explicit threads when it's a homework assignment :) –  Brian D May 3 '11 at 8:44

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