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I was wondering if anyone has any insights on how to make a function that will take a list and only return the terms that can be generated in x amount of time.

For instance, I have a function that takes something like 10 minutes to return only a few terms. Instead of guessing how many terms I'd be able to generate (with take x), I'd like to just feed in an infinite list into my inefficient function and have a separate function decide when to time out.

So something like this: [5,7,10] = takeUntilTime (10 sec) . inefficientFunction $ [1..]

I'm pretty new to haskell, but I think I can write that function to just check the timer after each new term is generated and stopping if the time has elapsed.

However, what if the 4th term takes an eternity? Would there be a way to stop the inefficientFunction from finishing the generation of that 4th term even though it has already started?

I don't have high hopes for a straightforward answer, but I appreciate any intuition on this. Thanks.

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1  
You want a timer to interrupt the computation of some values? Well I don't know what you want yet but it will have to be an IO operation. No pure function will do that. –  Robert Massaioli Feb 11 '11 at 0:39
1  
Specific use case? This is an interesting question but why would you do it in the "real world"? –  Dan Burton Feb 11 '11 at 2:25
    
I've been doing ProjectEuler(projecteuler.net) a lot lately and I like to generate quick experimental sequences and reference them on oeis.org. For example, there was some problem where the essence was that you had sticks laid end to end of length 1, 2, 3, etc, you then laid sticks of length 3, 5, etc next to those. The problem was finding the spaces where sticks lined up. If you do a naive approach (i.e. keeping a running total), you can barely generate 19 terms. (oeis.org/search?q=2,5,15,32,90,189,527,1104,3074,6437) (There's more to the problem, so I didn't cheat :)) –  Charles Durham Feb 11 '11 at 3:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Haven't put it through much testing, but this seems to work, at least on a small scale.

import Control.Concurrent
import Control.Exception
import Control.Monad

takeUntilTime :: Int -> [a] -> IO [a]
takeUntilTime limit list = do
    me <- myThreadId
    bracket (forkIO $ threadDelay limit >> throwTo me NonTermination) killThread
        . const $ tryTake list
  where
    (/:/) = liftM2 (:)
    tryTake list = handle (\NonTermination -> return []) $
        case list of
            [] -> return []
            x:xs -> evaluate x /:/ tryTake xs
ghci> takeUntilTime 1000000 [x | x <- [1..], x == 0]
[]
(1.02 secs, 153111264 bytes)
ghci> takeUntilTime 1000000 [maximum [y `mod` x | y <- [1..100000]] | x <- [1..]]
[0,1,2,3]
(1.00 secs, 186234264 bytes)
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This is definitely the right way of going about it. For more on this approach, see section 5.3 of the "awkward squad" paper: google.com/… –  Paul Johnson Feb 11 '11 at 18:05
    
And always be careful about feeding constants to threadDelay. If you need a time over maxBound :: Int (2^31-1) us then it would be best to use one of the event libraries. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Feb 11 '11 at 18:24
    
Hey, this is exactly what I was looking for, thank you so much! –  Charles Durham Feb 16 '11 at 23:34

Inspired by ephemient's answer I thought I'd post two generalisations of his solution.

Solution 1

import Control.Concurrent
import Control.Exception
import Control.Monad

doUntilTime :: Int -> IO a {- must handle NonTermination exception! -} -> IO a
doUntilTime limit action = do
  me <- myThreadId
  bracket (forkIO $ threadDelay limit >> throwTo me NonTermination) killThread
           . const $ action

Example

(/:/) = liftM2 (:)
tryTake list = handle (\NonTermination -> return []) $
   case list of
     [] -> return []
     x:xs -> evaluate x /:/ tryTake xs

test = do
  res <- doUntilTime 1000000 (tryTake [1..])
  putStrLn (show $ length res)

Solution 2

In this solution you pass a default value, an input, and a pre-recursive function to doUntilTime.

The pre-recursive function is written in a style where the first parameter, let's call it self, is used where you would have used a recursive call before. This saves you having to handle the NonTermination exception explicitly.

import Control.Concurrent
import Control.Exception
import Control.Monad

doUntilTime :: Int -> a -> b -> ((a -> IO b) -> (a -> IO b)) -> IO b
doUntilTime limit input defaultVal action = do
    me <- myThreadId
    bracket (forkIO $ threadDelay limit >> throwTo me NonTermination) killThread
        . const $ fix action input
  where
    fix f = f (\a -> handle (\NonTermination -> return defaultVal) (fix f a))

(/:/) = liftM2 (:)

-- tryTake is written in a "pre-recursive" style. There are no
-- occurrences of "tryTake" in the body only occurrences of
-- "self" (the first parameter)
tryTake :: ([Int] -> IO [Float]) -> ([Int] -> IO [Float])
tryTake self list =
   case list of
     [] -> return []
     x:xs -> evaluate (fromIntegral x) /:/ self xs

test = do
  res <- doUntilTime 1000000 [1..] [] tryTake
  print (length res)
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I think you asked two questions. 1. How to set time limit for taking elements from infinite list. 2. How to terminal a blocking function, or create a non-blocking function, like some network IO functions.

For the second one, you can refer to http://twelvestone.com/forum_thread/view/32028 for some idea. Then for the first one, you can suppose as a fact that inefficientFunction is non-blocking.

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I think what you want is this: System.Timeout

It allows IO events to time out. It has a function whose type is:

timeout :: Int -> IO a -> IO (Maybe a)

I think you should be able to use that. The way that I would do it is to use the timeout function and the Iterative Deepening approach to feed more and more into your function until it works. That way, when one finally hits the timeout you know that you have gone far enough.

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