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My question is about when a function should be referenced with the extern keyword in C.

I am failing to see when this should be used in practice. As I am writing a program all of the functions that I use are made available through the header files I have included. So why would it be useful to extern to get access to something that was not exposed in the header file?

I could be thinking about how extern works incorrectly, and if so please correct me.

Edit: Should you extern something when it is the default declaration without the keyword in a header file?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 100 down vote accepted

"extern" changes the linkage. With the keyword, the function / variable is assumed to be available somewhere else and the resolving is deferred to the linker.

There's a difference between "extern" on functions and on variables: on variables it doesn't instantiate the variable itself, i.e. doesn't allocate any memory. This needs to be done somewhere else. Thus it's important if you want to import the variable from somewhere else. For functions, this only tells the compiler that linkage is extern. As this is the default (you use the keyword "static" to indicate that a function is not bound using extern linkage) you don't need to use it explicitly.

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+1 Good answer. For future reference I would supplement it with lillq's answer/example –  Samaursa Apr 4 '11 at 16:20
1  
then why the same extern thing is there in Git:a very popular and modern software check it: github.com/git/git/blob/master/strbuf.h –  rsjethani Aug 11 '13 at 14:11
    
K&R do not note that it is default to declare function as "extern", however this answer solve my confusion! –  acgtyrant Feb 22 '14 at 8:12
    
@rsjethani I think it is to make the document more strict and format. –  acgtyrant Feb 22 '14 at 8:21

extern tells the compiler that this data is defined somewhere and will be connected with the linker.

With the help of the responses here and talking to a few friends here is the practical example of a use of extern.

Example 1 - to show a pitfall:

File stdio.h:

int errno;
/* other stuff...*/

myCFile1.c:
#include <stdio.h>

Code...

myCFile2.c:
#include <stdio.h>

Code...

If myCFile1.o and myCFile2.o are linked, each of the c files have separate copies of errno. This is a problem as errno is suppose to be constant over all linked files.

Example 2 - The fix.

File stdio.h:

extern int errno;
/* other stuff...*/

File stdio.c

int errno;

myCFile1.c:
#include <stdio.h>

Code...

myCFile2.c:
#include <stdio.h>

Code...

Now if both myCFile1.o and MyCFile2.o are linked by the linker they will both point to the same errno. Thus, solving the implementation with extern.

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25  
The problem isn't that the myCFile1 and myCFile2 modules have a separate copy of errno, it's that they are both exposing a symbol called "errno". When the linker sees this, it doesn't know which "errno" to pick, so it will bail out with an error message. –  cwick Feb 2 '09 at 16:52
    
what does "linked by the linker" actually means ? everybody uses this term, I don't find any definition :( –  Marcel Falliere Oct 1 '13 at 6:59
1  
@MarcelFalliere Wiki ~ Compiler compiles each source file on its own and creates an object file for each source file. Linker links these object files to 1 executable. –  Bitterblue Nov 21 '13 at 7:50
    
@cwick gcc isn't giving an error or warning even after using -Wall and -pedantic. Why ? and How ? –  Bhargav May 13 at 14:51

It has already been stated that the extern keyword is redundant for functions.

As for variables shared across compilation units, you should declare them in a header file with the extern keyword, then define them in a single source file, without the extern keyword. The single source file should be the one sharing the header file's name, for best practice.

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@aib "redundant for functions",check my comment in bluebrother's answer. –  rsjethani Aug 11 '13 at 14:15
    
What if you don't want to expose any of the functions in the header file? Wouldn't it be better to declare the the variable in one C file and access it by extern in another; let the linker resolve the problem and hide the rest of the header. –  ste3e Jan 27 '14 at 5:32

Well this question has already accepted the answer but here is my try to show some of the usage of the extern keyword. I ll begin with explaining extern keyword and then show the point by point example.

Keyword extern is used for declaring extern variables in c. This modifier is used with all data types like int, float, double, array, pointer, structure, function etc. 1. It is default storage class of all global variables as well all functions. For example, Analyze following two c code and its output:

(a)

#include <stdio.h>
int i;    //By default it is extern variable
int main(){
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: 0

(b)

#include <stdio.h>
extern int i;    //extern variable
int main(){
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: Compilation error, undefined symbol i.

Now the question may arise In Both program variable i is extern variable. But why output is different?

Ans: When we use extern modifier with any variables it is only declaration i.e. memory is not allocated for these variable. Hence in second case compiler is showing error unknown symbol i. To define a variable i.e. allocate the memory for extern variables it is necessary to initialize the variables

#include <stdio.h>
extern int i=10;    //extern variable
int main(){
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: 10

If you will not use extern keyword with global variables then compiler will automatically initialize with default value to extern variable.

Default initial value of extern integral type variable is zero otherwise null. For example:

#include <stdio.h>
char c;
int i;
float f;
char *str;  
int main(){
    printf("%d %d %f %s",c,i,f,str);
    return 0;
}

Output: 0 0 0.000000 (null)

We cannot initialize extern variable locally i.e. within any block either at the time of declaration or separately. We can only initialize extern variable globally. For example:

(a)

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    extern int i=10; //Try to initialize extern variable
                     //locally.
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: Compilation error: Cannot initialize extern variable.

(b)

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    extern int i; //Declaration of extern variable i.
    int i=10;     //Try to locally initialization of
                  //extern variable i.
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: Compilation error: Multiple declaration of variable i.

If we declare any variable as extern variable then it searches that variable either it has been initialized or not. If it has been initialized which may be either extern or static* then it is ok otherwise compiler will show an error. For example:

(a)

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    extern int i; //It will search the initialization of
                  //variable i.
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}
int i=20;    //Initialization of variable i.

Output: 20

(b)

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    extern int i; //It will search the any initialized
                  //variable i which may be static or 
                  //extern.
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}
extern int i=20; //Initialization of extern variable i.

Output: 20 (c)

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    extern int i; //It will search the any initialized
                  //variable i which may be static or 
                  //extern.
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}
static int i=20; //Initialization of static variable i.

Output: 20

A particular extern variable can be declared many times but we can initialize at only one time. For example:

(a)

extern int i; //Declaring the variable i.
int i=25;     //Initializing the variable.
extern int i; //Again declaring the variable i.
#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    extern int i; //Again declaring the variable i.
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: 25

(b)

extern int i; //Declaring the variable
int i=25;     //Initializing the variable
#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

int i=20; //Initializing the variable

Output: Compilation error: Multiple initialization variable i

We cannot write any assignment statement globally. For example:

#include <stdio.h>
extern int i;
int i=10;   //Initialization statement
i=25;       //Assignment statement
int main(){
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}

Output: Compilation error Note: Assigning any value to the variable at the time of declaration is known as initialization while assigning any value to variable not at the time of declaration is known assignment. (b)

#include <stdio.h>
extern int i;
int main(){
    i=25;       //Assignment statement
    printf("%d",i);
    return 0;
}
int i=10;   //Initialization statement

Output: 25

If declared an extern variables or function globally then its visibility will whole the program which may contain one file or many files. For example consider a c program which has written in two files named as one.c and two.c: (a)

//one.c

#include<conio.h>
int i=25; //By default extern variable
int j=5;  //By default extern variable
/**
Above two line is initialization of variable i and j.
*/
void main(){
    clrscr();
    sum();
    getch();
}

//two.c

#include<stdio.h>
extern int i; //Declaration of variable i.
extern int j; //Declaration of variable j.
/**
Above two lines will search the initialization statement of variable i and j either in two.c (if initialized variable is static or extern) or one.c (if initialized variable is extern) 
*/
void sum(){
    int s;
    s=i+j;
    printf("%d",s);
}

Hope this helps

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4  
This is a beautiful answer. Thank you Rohit! –  dotancohen Apr 2 at 9:41

In C, 'extern' is implied for function prototypes, as a prototype declares a function which is defined somewhere else. In other words, a function prototype has external linkage by default; using 'extern' is fine, but is redundant.

(If static linkage is required, the function must be declared as 'static' both in its prototype and function header, and these should normally both be in the same .c file).

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A very good article that I came about the extern keyword, along with the examples: http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/understanding-extern-keyword-in-c/

Though I do not agree that using extern in function declarations is redundant. This is supposed to be a compiler setting. So I recommend using the extern in the function declarations when it is needed.

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All declarations of functions and variables in header files should be extern.

Exceptions to this rule are inline functions defined in the header and variables which - although defined in the header - will have to be local to the translation unit (the source file the header gets included into): these should be static.

In source files, extern shouldn't be used for functions and variables defined in the file. Just prefix local definitions with static and do nothing for shared definitions - they'll be external symbols by default.

The only reason to use extern at all in a source file is to declare functions and variables which are defined in other source files and for which no header file is provided.


Declaring function prototypes extern is actually unnecessary. Some people dislike it because it will just waste space and function declarations already have a tendency to overflow line limits. Others like it because this way, functions and variables can be treated the same way.

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Can you give a reason to why "All declarations of functions and variables in header files should be extern."? It look to me from the other responses that they are extern by default. –  lillq Jan 30 '09 at 20:48
    
@Lane: extern is optional for function declarations, but I like to treat variables and functions the same way - at least that's the most reasonable thing I could come up with, as I don't exactly remember why I started doing this ;) –  Christoph Jan 30 '09 at 21:25
    
Isn't it a better idea to always include global variables into the C file so they do not get seen by other random C files that include the header. And to always use extern on every global except the initialized true sink as a matter of clarity; if it is prefixed extern then it is defined elsewhere. –  ste3e Jan 27 '14 at 5:38

When you have that function defined on a different dll or lib, so that the compiler defers to the linker to find it. Typical case is when you are calling functions from the OS API.

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Functions actually defined in other source files should only be declared in headers. In this case, you should use extern when declaring the prototype in a header.

Most of the time, your functions will be one of the following (more like a best practice):

  • static (normal functions that aren't visible outside that .c file)
  • static inline (inlines from .c or .h files)
  • extern (declaration in headers of the next kind (see below))
  • [no keyword whatsoever] (normal functions meant to be accessed using extern declarations)
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Why would you extern when declaring the prototype if this is the default? –  lillq Jan 30 '09 at 20:36
    
@Lane: Might be a bit biased, but every sane project I've worked on uses the following convention: in headers, declare prototypes only for external functions (hence extern). In .c files, plain prototypes can be used to obviate the need for specific ordering, but they shouldn't be placed in headers. –  Eduard - Gabriel Munteanu Jan 30 '09 at 21:38

If each file in your program is first compiled to an object file, then the object files are linked together, you need extern. It tells the compiler "This function exists, but the code for it is somewhere else. Don't panic."

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Um, that's how translation is normally done: source files compile to object files, and are then linked. When would you not need extern in that case? Nor would you use #include to get functions, but rather function prototypes. I don't understand what you're talking about. –  David Thornley Jan 30 '09 at 17:56
    
I seem to be having this problem lately of misreading things. Sorry about that. When I was new to C, I would #include "file.c" to just include the functions in one file directly into the other file. Then I figured out how to use 'extern'. I thought he was making the same mistake I was. –  Chris Lutz Jan 30 '09 at 18:18

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