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I am using Perl, and I need to determine if two arithmetic expression trees are "equal". By equal, I mean the shape of the trees are equal, not the particular values held within. So, for instance [ 'internal', '-' [ 'leaf', 5] ['leaf', 4]] is not the same as [ 'internal', 'average', [ 'internal', '+', [ 'leaf', 42], [ 'leaf', 10 ] ], [ 'leaf', 1 ] ], but is the same as [ 'internal', '+' [ 'leaf', 3] ['leaf', 20]]. So, I am simply looking to match the shape. I have a subroutine that I had hoped to be able to do this, but so far, I am unable to make it properly match. Here is the subroutine:

sub isEqualShape {
    my ($ex1, $ex2) = @_;
    my $node_type = $ex1->[0];
    my $node_type2= $ex2->[0];
    my $check;
    foreach (@$ex1){
        if ( $node_type eq 'leaf' && $node_type2 eq 'leaf'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        elsif ($node_type eq 'internal' && $node_type2 eq 'internal'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        else {
            $check = 0;
            return 0;
            last;
        }
    }
    foreach (@$ex2){
        if ( $node_type eq 'leaf' && $node_type2 eq 'leaf'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        elsif ($node_type eq 'internal' && $node_type2 eq 'internal'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        else {
            $check = 0;
            return 0;
            last;
        }  
    }
    return $check;
}

and here is my test file:

my $ex1 = [ 'leaf', 42];

my $ex2 = [ 'internal', '+', [ 'leaf', 42], [ 'leaf', 10 ] ];

my $ex3 = [ 'internal', 'average', $ex2, [ 'leaf', 1 ] ];

my $tree = isEqualShape($ex2, $ex3);
if ($tree eq '1'){
    print "Shapes Are Equal\n";
}
else {
    print "Shapes Are Not Equal \n";
}

When comparing between ex1 and either ex2 or ex3, this returns Shapes are Not Equal, as it is supposed to. However, it returns shape is equal when comparing either ex2 or ex3. How can I fix this, and maybe make this more generalizable?

Edit: I've also tried using popping from an array, but this results in a reference error (I'm new to the whole reference thing).

sub isEqualShape {
    my @array = @_;
    my ($ex1, $ex2) = @array;
    my $node_type = $ex1->[0];
    my $node_type2= $ex2->[0];
    my $check;
    foreach (@$ex1){
        if ( $node_type eq 'leaf' && $node_type2 eq 'leaf'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        elsif ($node_type eq 'internal' && $node_type2 eq 'internal'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        else {
            $check = 0;
            return 0;
            last;
        }
    }
    for (@$ex2){
        if ( $node_type eq 'leaf' && $node_type2 eq 'leaf'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        elsif ($node_type eq 'internal' && $node_type2 eq 'internal'){
            $check = 1;
        }
        else {
            $check = 0;
            return 0;
            last;
        }
        pop @$ex1;
        pop @$ex2, isEqualShape(@$ex1, @$ex2);
    }
    return $check;
}

The result given to me is: Can't use string ('internal') as an ARRAY while 'strict refs' are in use. How can I fix this?

share|improve this question
    
You never actually modify $node_type or $node_type2. –  Anon. Feb 11 '11 at 1:16
    
Yes, I noticed that so I tried popping the values from an array, but I end up with referencing errors. I'll edit my question and show what else I've tried and what happened as a result. –  Sheldon Feb 11 '11 at 1:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To determine if the structures are the same shape, you will need to use a recursive algorithm (or an iterative one with a stack).

You don't have many test cases to work with, but this should do the trick:

sub isEqualShape {
    my ($x, $y) = @_;

    if (@$x == @$y and $$x[0] eq $$y[0]) {  # same length and node type
        for (2 .. $#$x) {
            isEqualShape($$x[$_], $$y[$_]) or return undef;  # same child shape
        }
        return 1;
    }
    return undef;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just want to say: I love you. <3 Thank you so much for your help, both on this problem and my other one! Its people like you that reaffirm my ailing belief that not all of the internet is composed of trolls. You are a life saver. Thank you. –  Sheldon Feb 11 '11 at 1:24
3  
boolean functions should return scalars, even in list context, the horrible advice in PBP notwithstanding –  ysth Feb 11 '11 at 2:18
1  
@ysth => Since the return value of predicates in Perl is so mixed, I usually find it best to just program defensively at the call site. But I have updated the answer to return undef instead of () on failure. –  Eric Strom Feb 11 '11 at 16:59

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