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I saw this: http://yukelzon.blogspot.com/2005/07/python-locks.html when looking for a solution to add some locking to existing code around writing to a file.

The simplified version for my needs looks like this:

  def mlock(orig):
    def inner(*args, **kwargs):
      Coloring.lock.acquire()
      try:
        ret = orig(*args, **kwargs)
        return ret
      finally:
        Coloring.lock.release()
    return inner

The lock is a class variable. Can any one think of improvements or better ways?

share|improve this question
    
The scheme for accessing the lock, whether global or given, has no "right way", just different ways depending on needs. The answered version is identical in function to the semi-official version on the python wiki, which is also worth a look: wiki.python.org/moin/PythonDecoratorLibrary –  user318904 Feb 15 '11 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're using Python 2.6+ (I think), mutex objects are context managers, so:

def mlock(f):
    def inner(*args, **kwargs):
        with Coloring.lock:
            return f(*args, **kwargs)
    return inner
share|improve this answer

I'm not a fan of free variables. I would probably make the lock an explicit variable of the decorator, like so:

def mlock(Coloring):
    def mlock_decorator(orig):
        def inner(*args, **kwargs):
          Coloring.lock.acquire()
          try:
            ret = orig(*args, **kwargs)
            return ret
          finally:
            Coloring.lock.release()
        return inner
    return mlock_decorator

Well, since Coloring is a class variable, and if you expect this to be pretty specific to that class, access it explicitly:

def mlock(orig):
    def inner(self, *args, **kwargs):
      self.Coloring.lock.acquire()
      try:
        ret = orig(self, *args, **kwargs)
        return ret
      finally:
        self.Coloring.lock.release()
    return inner

Or, at very least, declare that the lock is a global

def mlock(orig):
    global Coloring
    def inner(*args, **kwargs):
      Coloring.lock.acquire()
      try:
        ret = orig(*args, **kwargs)
        return ret
      finally:
        Coloring.lock.release()
    return inner
share|improve this answer

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