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I made a little code for creating a matrix of coordinates (like a chessboard), it's the following:

createMatrix(N,M,R) :- creaMatriu(N,M,A), reversed(R,A).
creaMatriu(N,0,[T]) :- creafila(N,0,T),!.
creaMatriu(N,M,[T|C]) :- creafila(N,M,T), M1 is M-1, creaMatriu(N,M1,C).
creafila(0,M,[[M,0]]):-!.
creafila(N,M,[[M,N]|C]) :-N1 is N-1,creafila(N1,M,C).
reversed(A, B) :- reversed(B, [], A).
reversed([A|B], C, D) :- reverse(N,A),reversed(B, [N|C], D).
reversed([], A, A).

The first time I executed it went well, but when i incremented the dimensions of the matrix, the "dots" at the end of the matrix begin to appear incrementing one coordinate as the dimension rises, as like this:

?- createMatrix(1,1,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1]], [[1, 0], [1, 1]]] .

?- createMatrix(2,1,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1], [0, 2]], [[1, 0], [1, 1], [1, 2]]] .

?- createMatrix(2,2,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1], [0, 2]], [[1, 0], [1, 1], [1, 2]], [[2, 0], [2, 1], [2, 2]]] .

?- createMatrix(3,2,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1], [0, 2], [0, 3]], [[1, 0], [1, 1], [1, 2], [1, 3]], [[2, 0], [2, 1], [2, 2], [2, 3]]] .

?- createMatrix(3,3,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1], [0, 2], [0, 3]], [[1, 0], [1, 1], [1, 2], [1, 3]], [[2, 0], [2, 1], [2, 2], [2, 3]], [[3, 0], [3, 1], [3, 2], [3|...]]] .

?- createMatrix(4,3,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1], [0, 2], [0, 3], [0, 4]], [[1, 0], [1, 1], [1, 2], [1, 3], [1, 4]], [[2, 0], [2, 1], [2, 2], [2, 3], [2|...]], [[3, 0], [3, 1], [3, 2], [3|...], [...|...]]] .

?- createMatrix(4,4,R).
R = [[[0, 0], [0, 1], [0, 2], [0, 3], [0, 4]], [[1, 0], [1, 1], [1, 2], [1, 3], [1, 4]], [[2, 0], [2, 1], [2, 2], [2, 3], [2|...]], [[3, 0], [3, 1], [3, 2], [3|...], [...|...]], [[4, 0], [4, 1], [4|...], [...|...]|...]] .

Anyone have any clue why this happens?

Thank you!

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The answer by false below gives you a thorough explanation of the ellipsis (...) in a default display by "toplevel" Prolog queries that contain unbound variables. Your question suggests that the list of lists is to represent a 2D array "like a chessboard". If that's the case, you'll find it useful to write a custom display predicate. The ellipsis (...) will not appear if you use write/1 to display a Prolog term, and a more chessboard-like appearance can be achieved by separating lists with newlines. –  hardmath Feb 12 '11 at 10:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By default, the toplevel loop of SWI prints terms up to depth 10. Deeper parts are replaced by ... You can extend that depth or remove that limit by setting the depth to 0.


?- length(L,10).
L = [_G317, _G320, _G323, _G326, _G329, _G332, _G335, _G338, _G341|...].

?- current_prolog_flag(toplevel_print_options,V).
V = [quoted(true), portray(true), max_depth(10), spacing(next_argument)].

?- set_prolog_flag(toplevel_print_options, [quoted(true), portray(true), max_depth(0), spacing(next_argument)]).
true.

?- length(L,10).
L = [_G320, _G323, _G326, _G329, _G332, _G335, _G338, _G341, _G344, _G347].
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