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I'm trying to serialize a custom class that needs to use multiple elements of the same name.
I've tried using xmlarray, but it wraps them in another elements.

I want my xml to look like this.

<root>
     <trees>some text</trees>
     <trees>some more text</trees>
</root>

My code:

[Serializable(), XmlRoot("root")]
public class test
{
      [XmlArray("trees")]
      public ArrayList MyProp1 = new ArrayList();

      public test()
      {
           MyProp1.Add("some text");
           MyProp1.Add("some more text");  
      }
}
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have you tried setting attribute XmlArrayItem(typeof(System.String)) along with the XMLArray ? –  Perpetualcoder Jan 30 '09 at 18:14
    
yes, it creates something like the xml below <root> <tree> <string>some text</string> <string>some more text</string> </tree> </root> –  dfghfghfdgh Jan 31 '09 at 0:20
    
Good question, bad title. Title should be "How to flatten an array/list/collection with XmlSerializer" –  Giulio Vian Sep 2 '11 at 13:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try just using [XmlElement("trees")]:

[Serializable(), XmlRoot("root")]
public class test
{
    [XmlElement("trees")]
    public List<string> MyProp1 = new List<string>();

    public test()
    {
        MyProp1.Add("some text");
        MyProp1.Add("some more text");
    }
}

Note I changed ArrayList to List<string> to clean up the output; in 1.1, StringCollection would be another option, although that has different case-sensitivity rules.

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this works perfectly thanks –  dfghfghfdgh Feb 4 '09 at 1:31
    
Thank you! Exactly what I was looking for! –  Simon Gillbee Jun 19 '09 at 18:10

(edit: obsoleted - my second post ([XmlElement]) is the way to go - I'm leaving this for posterity in using xsd.exe)

xsd.exe is your friend. Copy the xml you want into a file (foo.xml), then use:

xsd foo.xml
xsd foo.xsd /classes

Now read foo.cs; you can use this either directly, or just for inspiration.

(edit: output snipped - not helpful any more)

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