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I have to prepend some arbitrary text to an existing, but very large (2 - 10 GB range) text file. With the file being so large, I'm trying to avoid reading the entire file in to memory. But am I being too conservative with a line-by-line iteration? Would moving to a readlines(sizehint) approach give me much of a performance advantage over my current approach?

The delete-and-move at the end is less than ideal but, as far as I know, there's no way to do this sort of manipulation with linear data, in place. But I'm not so well versed in Python -- maybe there's something unique to Python I can exploit to do this better?

import os
import shutil
def prependToFile(f, text):
    f_temp = generateTempFileName(f)
    inFile  = open(f, 'r')
    outFile = open(f_temp, 'w')    
    outFile.write('# START\n')
    outFile.write('%s\n' % str(text))
    outFile.write('# END\n\n')
    for line in inFile:
        outFile.write(line)
    inFile.close()
    outFile.close()
    os.remove(f)
    shutil.move(f_temp, f)
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you want to do is read the file in large (anywhere from 64k to several MB) blocks and write the blocks out. In other words, instead of individual lines, use huge blocks. That way you do the fewest I/Os possible and hopefully your process is I/O-bound instead of CPU-bound.

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so a follow-on then: is there a way to determine the optimal block size to feed in to readlines() or read()? Machine memory could be 2 GB or it could be >>2 GB. And the OS could be any Windows variant or any Linux variant really. Is there a way to auto-tune at run time for best performance? –  Ian C. Feb 11 '11 at 2:51
2  
There is probably no real advantage to using more than a few MB for your buffer. However, you could start with 4kB transfers and time them. After transferring many MB at a given size, double the buffer size and see if it's faster. Once notice that it's not getting any faster, stop doubling and use the previous size for your buffer. –  Gabe Feb 11 '11 at 3:02
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To be honest, I would recommend you just write this in C instead if you're worried about execution time. Doing system calls from Python can be quite slow, and since you'll have to do a lot of them whether you do the line-by-line or raw block read approach, that will really drag things down.

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You think making system calls in Python is slow? That's nothing compared to how long it takes to read and write a 10GB file! –  Gabe Feb 11 '11 at 2:47
    
This has to be in Python unfortunately. Design constraint. –  Ian C. Feb 11 '11 at 2:48
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You can use tools better suited to the job os.system("cat file1 file2 > file3")

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What if he's running on a system that doesn't have cat? What if he doesn't want to worry about spaces or other special characters in the filenames? –  Gabe Feb 11 '11 at 2:44
    
I can't count on cat existing on the system. –  Ian C. Feb 11 '11 at 2:47
    
you can if you ship it. cat.exe exists. –  SpliFF Feb 11 '11 at 2:50
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If this is on Windows NTFS, you can insert into the middle of a file. (Or so I'm told, I'm not a Windows developer).

If this is on a POSIX (Linux or Unix) system, you should use "cat" as someone else said. cat is wickedly efficient, using every trick in the book to get optimal performance (ie. voids copying buffers, etc.)

However, if you must do it in python, the code you presented could be improved by using shutil.copyfileobj() (which takes 2 file handles) and tempfile.TemporaryFile (create a file that automatically gets deleted on close):

import os
import shutil
import tempfile

def prependToFile(f, text):
    outFile = tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile(dir='.', delete=False)
    outFile.write('# START\n')
    outFile.write('%s\n' % str(text))
    outFile.write('# END\n\n')
    shutil.copyfileobj(file(f, 'r'), outFile)
    os.remove(f)
    shutil.move(outFile.name, f)
    outFile.close()

I think the os.remove(f) isn't needed as shutil.move() will delete f. However, you should test that. Also, the "delete=False" may not be needed but may be safe to leave it.

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