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I have heard that using exception trapping is not a recommended practice for number testing.

For example:

bool isnumeric
try
{
int i = int.parse(textbox1.text);
isnumeric = true;
}

catch {isnumenric=false}

Is there some other way that I could test for numbers in C#?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Yes try using

int i;    
bool success = Int32.TryParse(textBox1.text, out i);

The TryParse method basically does what you are doing above.

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Also don't forget double.TryParse() and decimal.TryParse(), since those are numeric as well. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 30 '09 at 18:07
    
However, TryParse() doesn't just mimic his initial code, where the exception is just swallowed. It's a little different, in that an exception is never thrown in the first place. It's more likely that Int32.Parse() calls TryParse() and throws if false is returned. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 30 '09 at 18:08
    
if you look at mine a couple answers down, it has the same functionality –  naspinski Jan 30 '09 at 18:17
    
@napinski: Don't sweat it... My answer is identical, and was before this one chronologically. It's all down to the luck of the draw :) –  Andrew Rollings Jan 30 '09 at 19:48
    
If you like the ternary operator, you can make it pretty terse: int value; int default = -1; return Int32.TryParse(text, out value) ? value : default; –  Lee Harold Jan 30 '09 at 19:50

Use the built-in TryParse

E.g.

int number;
bool result = Int32.TryParse(value, out number);
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Yes. Use int.TryParse, double.TryParse, etc. instead, which all return a boolean.

Alternately, there's an IsNumeric function buried in the VB assemblies (in the Microsoft.VisualBasic namespace in Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll) that you can also call from your C# code:

bool Microsoft.VisualBasic.Information.IsNumeric(value)

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Why was this downvoted? –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Jan 30 '09 at 18:10
    
I was wondering the same thing. –  TheSmurf Jan 30 '09 at 18:10
    
Perhaps someone who dislikes VB –  Nifle Jan 30 '09 at 18:20
    
Probably. Should note: if you're using a pre-2.0 .NET, the VB way is the easiest way (barring exception handling), since TryParse didn't exist at that point. –  TheSmurf Jan 30 '09 at 18:24
    
+1 for pre2.0 comment. –  Andrew Rollings Jan 30 '09 at 19:54

TryParse()

int i;
if(Int32.TryParse(someString,out i))
{
    //now use i because you know it is valid
    //otherwise, TryParse would have returned false
}
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+1 for giving me a great tip –  Nifle Jan 30 '09 at 18:21
int result = -1;
bool isNumeric = Int32.TryParse(text, out result);

isNumeric will be true if the number is numeric, false otherwise; if the number is numeric, result will have the numeric value of the number.

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hi DrjOkepu, the variable has to be uninitialized in order to use "out"? –  Nick Berardi Jan 30 '09 at 18:06
    
Nick Berardi: As DannuSmurf said, it does not require to be unitialized. In fact, even though it can be unitialized, I really suggest to initialize all your variables to some value even though you will assign some value to it later on. It is just good practice. –  Tamas Czinege Jan 30 '09 at 18:12
    
That is my bad, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t3c3bfhx.aspx I got the reverse of "ref" mixed up. –  Nick Berardi Jan 30 '09 at 20:14

bool TryParse(string, out int)

It will return a bool that is true if it was able to parse the integer, and the out parameter will contain the integer (if it was successful with the parsing).

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If you just need to do number testing and do not need the integer number, you may use the function below. This is faster than Int32.TryParse(...) methods.

Edit for Barry Fandango: Handles negative numbers now. This is only for testing integers.

    public static bool IsNumber(string s)
    {
       if (s == null || s.Length == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (s[0] == '-')
        {
            for (int i = 1; i < s.Length; i++)
            {
                if (!char.IsDigit(s[i]))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (char c in s)
            {
                if (!char.IsDigit(c))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        return true;
    }
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Negative numbers? Decimal points? –  Barry Fandango Jan 30 '09 at 21:07
    
Please see edit note. It handles negative numbers now. This is only for testing integers. –  aygunes Jan 30 '09 at 21:19

If you want the integer then Int32.TryParse(...) is what you want else Information.IsNumeric(...) (From the Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll) if you don't care what the actual integer is.

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