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void Main()
{
    List<Person> person = new List<Person>
    {
        new Person { Name = "Maria Anders", Age = 21 },
        new Person { Name = "Ana Trujillo", Age = 55 },
        new Person { Name = "Thomas Hardy", Age = 40 },
        new Person { Name = "Laurence Lebihan", Age = 18 },
        new Person { Name = "Victoria Ashworth", Age = 16 },
        new Person { Name = "Ann Devon", Age = 12 }
    };

    person.Select(x => new { x.Name, x.Age }).Dump();
}

class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

If not, can you please convert it into 2.0 coding.

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Have you tried this? Why not? And are you aware that the version of .NET and the version of the C# language do not need to agree? What version of C# and Visual Studio are you using? –  John Saunders Feb 11 '11 at 3:28
    
I haven't tried yet. I'm in office, there's no visual studio here. –  yonan2236 Feb 11 '11 at 3:42
    
For Linq in 2.0 see code.google.com/p/linqbridge –  csharptest.net Feb 11 '11 at 3:46
    
step 1, install required tools/techologies. step 2, try it. step 3, if your having issues, come back here and ask a question. You have skipped steps 1 and 2. –  RPM1984 Feb 11 '11 at 3:49
    
I have no admin rights to install any software in my workstation. I will try when I got home. I'm only a programmer in my home, my job is not. –  yonan2236 Feb 11 '11 at 3:58
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As John says in his comment, there are two issues here: C# language version and .NET version.

Generics will work in C# 2 and above (VS2005 and above), and .NET 2.0 and above.

Object initialisers will work in C# 3 and above (VS2008 and above), but do not require any particular version of the .NET Framework.

LINQ requires C# 3 or above, and .NET 3.5 and above.

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Depends which parts of Linq. Lambdas and extension methods are smoke and mirrors and only require C# 3.0. It does NOT require .Net 3.5. All the extension methods on IEnumerable are part of .Net 3.5, but theoretically, you can write your own extension methods using C# 3.0 against the .Net 2.0 framework. –  BFree Feb 11 '11 at 3:45
    
Extension methods on pre-3.5 frameworks: well, sort of, but they do require the "declare your own ExtensionAttribute" kludge. With that caveat, you're right, of course: you could implement all the extension methods, delegate types, etc. yourself (or get them from something like LinqBridge or EduLinq). So yes, fair point: out of the box, LINQ requires .NET 3.5, but it can indeed be added to .NET 2.0 (with C# 3). Indeed, that's exactly what Microsoft did... grin –  itowlson Feb 11 '11 at 4:07
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Depending what your Dump method is supposed to do, C# 3.0 code targeting .NET 2.0 * might look like this:

static void Main()
{
    List<Person> person = new List<Person>
    {
        new Person { Name = "Maria Anders", Age = 21 },
        new Person { Name = "Ana Trujillo", Age = 55 },
        new Person { Name = "Thomas Hardy", Age = 40 },
        new Person { Name = "Laurence Lebihan", Age = 18 },
        new Person { Name = "Victoria Ashworth", Age = 16 },
        new Person { Name = "Ann Devon", Age = 12 }
    };

    person.ForEach(x => Dump(x));

}

static void Dump(Person p)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1}", p.Name, p.Age);
}

class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}

* See itowlson's answer for the details on C# version versus .NET platform version.

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