Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This won't compile:

namespace Constructor0Args
{
    class Base
    {
        public Base(int x)
        {
        }
    }

    class Derived : Base
    {
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        }
    }
}

Instead, I get the following error:

'Constructor0Args.Base' does not contain a constructor that takes 0 arguments

Why is that? Is it necessary for a base class to have a constructor that takes 0 arguments?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 25 down vote accepted

It isn't - the problem is that it needs to call some base constructor, in order to initialise the base type, and the default is to call base(). You can tweak that by specifying the specific constructor (and arguments) yourself in the derived-types constructor:

class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived() : base(123) {}
}

For parameters to base (or alternatively, this) constructors, you can use:

  • parameters to the current constructor
  • literals / constants
  • static method calls (also involving the above)

For example, the following is also valid, using all three bullets above:

class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived(string s) : base(int.Parse(s, NumberStyles.Any)) {}
}
share|improve this answer
2  
^^ This post entirely nullifies any chances of poor programmers (like me) to score on such questions.. :@#$%^*&&!_ (j/k) –  Dienekes Feb 11 '11 at 6:37
    
Ah.. of course. This makes sense now :) –  Mark Feb 11 '11 at 6:42
8  
You could also add a parameterless constructor on the base type and mark it as protected. This would allow a derived type to use the default constructor, but consumers of your type could not create an instance using it. –  Josh Feb 11 '11 at 6:52
    
@Josh that is a useful pattern, especially for things like interfaces. –  tenpn Feb 11 '11 at 8:54
add comment

When you derive a class from another, the base class will be called before the derived classes constructor. When you don't explicitly call a constructor you are essentially writing

class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived() : base()
    {
    }
}

Since the Base class doesn't have a 0 argument constructor, this is invalid.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you don't explicitly define a constructor for a class, a default constructor is automatically defined, which looks like this:

public Derived() : base() 
{
}

You need to specify the constructor on the base class as well as which arguments to pass to it:

public Derived() : base(1) 
{
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is becase when the child class is instantiated, it will also instantiate the base class. By default, it will try to find a arg less constructor. This is work with this code:

class Base
    {
        public Base(int x) { }
    }
    class Derived : Base
    {
        public Derived(int x)
            : base(x)
        {
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.