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I am currently writing a deployment script that installs a number of Windows services.

The services names are versioned, so I want to delete the prior Windows service version as part of the installs of the new service.

How can I best do this in PowerShell?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 55 down vote accepted

You need to use WMI for this since there is no Remove-Service cmdlet

For example,

$service = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='servicename'"
$service.delete()
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1  
You could also port the relevant part of this example to powershell (use the TransactedInstaller class): eggheadcafe.com/articles/20060104.asp However ravikanth's method is probably simpler. –  JohnL Feb 11 '11 at 10:57

There's no harm in using the right tool for the job, I find running (from Powershell)

sc.exe \\server delete "MyService" 

the most reliable method that does not have many dependencies.

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9  
The .exe part is very important as sc on its own is an alias for Set-Content. –  tjrobinson Aug 29 '13 at 14:13
    
@tjrobinson Thanks for that, I had omitted the .exe until I saw your comment. Now its working for me. –  gwin003 Oct 22 '13 at 12:35
    
@tjrobinson: You are a hero! –  Valipour May 19 at 11:13

If you just want to check service existence:

if (Get-Service "My Service" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)
{
    "service exists"
}
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I used the "-ErrorAction SilentlyContinue" solution but then later ran into the problem that it leaves an ErrorRecord behind. So here's another solution to just checking if the Service exists using "Get-Service".

# Determines if a Service exists with a name as defined in $ServiceName.
# Returns a boolean $True or $False.
Function ServiceExists([string] $ServiceName) {
    [bool] $Return = $False
    # If you use just "Get-Service $ServiceName", it will return an error if 
    # the service didn't exist.  Trick Get-Service to return an array of 
    # Services, but only if the name exactly matches the $ServiceName.  
    # This way you can test if the array is emply.
    if ( Get-Service "$ServiceName*" -Include $ServiceName ) {
        $Return = $True
    }
    Return $Return
}

[bool] $thisServiceExists = ServiceExists "A Service Name"
$thisServiceExists 

But ravikanth has the best solution since the Get-WmiObject will not throw an error if the Service didn't exist. So I settled on using:

Function ServiceExists([string] $ServiceName) {
    [bool] $Return = $False
    if ( Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='$ServiceName'" ) {
        $Return = $True
    }
    Return $Return
}

So to offer a more complete solution:

# Deletes a Service with a name as defined in $ServiceName.
# Returns a boolean $True or $False.  $True if the Service didn't exist or was 
# successfully deleted after execution.
Function DeleteService([string] $ServiceName) {
    [bool] $Return = $False
    $Service = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Service -Filter "Name='$ServiceName'" 
    if ( $Service ) {
        $Service.Delete()
        if ( -Not ( ServiceExists $ServiceName ) ) {
            $Return = $True
        }
    } else {
        $Return = $True
    }
    Return $Return
}
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Combining Dmitri & dcx's answers I made this:

function Confirm-WindowsServiceExists($name)
{   
    if (Get-Service $name -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)
    {
        return $true
    }
    return $false
}

function Remove-WindowsServiceIfItExists($name)
{   
    $exists = Confirm-WindowsServiceExists $name
    if ($exists)
    {    
        sc.exe \\server delete $name
    }       
}
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Adapted this to take an input list of servers, specify a hostname and give some helpful output

            $name = "<ServiceName>"
            $servers = Get-content servers.txt

            function Confirm-WindowsServiceExists($name)
            {   
                if (Get-Service -Name $name -Computername $server -ErrorAction Continue)
                {
                    Write-Host "$name Exists on $server"
                    return $true
                }
                    Write-Host "$name does not exist on $server"
                    return $false
            }

            function Remove-WindowsServiceIfItExists($name)
            {   
                $exists = Confirm-WindowsServiceExists $name
                if ($exists)
                {    
                    Write-host "Removing Service $name from $server"
                    sc.exe \\$server delete $name
                }       
            }

            ForEach ($server in $servers) {Remove-WindowsServiceIfItExists($name)}
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One could use Where-Object

if ((Get-Service | Where-Object {$_.Name -eq $serviceName}).length -eq 1) { "Service Exists" }

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To check if a Windows service named MySuperServiceVersion1 exists, even when you might not be sure of its exact name, you could employ a wildcard, using a substring like so:

 if (Get-Service -Name "*SuperService*" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)
{
    # do something
}
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