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I have a windows service that invokes some heavy image processing whenever a user sends some data to it. So if there are more than one data, the data is queued up and is processed in order. however sometimes processing the data may go for a toss, and the processing hangs in there forever. Not sure yet why that happens. When this happens I want to restart the serivice by itself, so that when the service restarts next one from the queue is picked up. My question is is it a good idea to restart the service within itself? can you even do that or is there any other way to do it?

Sapna

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If the service hangs, how is it supposed to restart itself? –  Oded Feb 11 '11 at 10:01
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As Oded said in his comment, if the service has hung, it can't restart itself. It would be best if you could figure out why it hangs and just stop it from hanging altogether, but assuming that that's not possible for some reason.

The two options I can think of would be if the image processing is done in a thread, and it's only that thread that hangs, then you might be able to have a separate "monitoring" thread that keeps checking if the processing thread is still happy and otherwise it kills it and restarts it. Or, if the whole service hangs, you could have a separate monitoring service, that does the checking and restarting.

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well, yes..that is done. I use a timeout to check if the service is processing is stuck. This is done in the service itself. But I want to restart the service before next data is picked up for procesing, just to make sure previous processing error does not corrupt the memory and affect the next processing. So Would be wise to use Environment.Exit within the service once i detect the processing has crashed? It is an automatic service so it would start again by itself after a min? Any other suggestions? –  Sapna Feb 11 '11 at 11:11
    
@Sapna: If I wanted to do something like what you say, then I'd create one service that controls the processing and let that service create a new process to do the actual processing. That way you can leave the service running the whole time without risking that it hangs and the service can easily monitor if the processing process has exited (maybe due to exiting due to it hanging) and could just start another instance of it. It feels wrong to have the service Exit like you suggest. –  ho1 Feb 11 '11 at 15:45
    
@Sapna: And since the processing would then be done in a separate non-service process, it would be easier to test that that all works fine, and the service would be quite small and easy. –  ho1 Feb 11 '11 at 15:46
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you have three tasks:

  1. detect that service is stuck: this can be done in different ways, the first one would be to use timeouts
  2. restart the service: can be done by separate monitoring service or by another thread of the same service
  3. handle task queue between different service instances: you need to serialize your task queue to disk so when service is restarted it can continue handling the queue
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well, yes..that is done. I use a timeout to check if the service is processing is stuck. This is done in the service itself. But I want to restart the service before next data is picked up for procesing, just to make sure previous processing error does not corrupt the memory and affect the next processing. So Would be wise to use Environment.Exit within the service once i detect the processing has crashed? It is an automatic service so it would start again by itself after a min? Any other suggestions? –  Sapna Feb 11 '11 at 11:22
    
@Sapna: automatic means that service will be automatically started on system logon. you need to do this manually, preferably from separate service. also don't remove task from the queue on the disk until it's completed. in this case you won't lose your tasks –  Andy T Feb 11 '11 at 11:32
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