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Is there a trick to inject arbitrary content into the DOM, and then select on that content, without knowing what the content is?

Example:

function myInjector( _htmlElement ) {
    $('#target').replaceWith(_htmlElement);
    /* Is it possible to then select the injected element here? */
}

I appreciate any advice provided.

Thanks.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need to select it - you already have a reference to it stored in the _htmlElement variable:

function myInjector( _htmlElement ) {
    $('#target').replaceWith(_htmlElement);

    alert(_htmlElement.parentNode.tagName);
}

Edit — just create the new jQuery object first and store it in a variable:

function myInjector( _htmlElement ) {
    var newEl = $(_htmlElement);
    $('#target').replaceWith(newEl);

    alert(newEl.parent()[0].tagName);
}
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Even if _htmlElement is only a string of content? –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:23
    
@Spot: Then you should not call the variable _htmlElement ;) –  Felix Kling Feb 11 '11 at 10:23
    
@Felix I don't care what the var is called. That is not the point of the question. –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:24
    
@Andy: Thanks for the update. Unfortunate this does not help me, as seen on the replaceWidth() doc page: "However, it must be noted that the original jQuery object is returned. This object refers to the element that has been removed from the DOM, not the new element that has replaced it." –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:35
    
@Andy: Accidental CR there. :) Anyway, I need the new content, not the existing content. I can make the user pass a selector to find the new content. But before doing that I wanted to see if there was a way to do it in a cleaner manner. –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:36
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You can wrap the _htmlElement in $, making it a jQuery object.

function myInjector( _htmlElement ) {
    var element = $(_htmlElement);
    $('#target').replaceWith(_htmlElement);

    element.css('color', 'green');
}
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Thanks but htmlElement in this case, is a string of html content (yes the var name is misleading). –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:37
    
@Spot That doesn't make a difference, at least my test suggests so. –  Reiner Gerecke Feb 11 '11 at 10:40
    
Hmm, I wish I was getting the same results that you are. :) That would be what I need. Very weird. Is your test the exact code you have above? If so, what is the content of htmlElement? –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:45
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function myInjector(_htmlElement) {
var injected = $(_htmlElement);
$('#target').replaceWith(injected);
// injected is the reference :)
};
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Thanks but htmlElement in this case, is a string of html content (yes the var name is misleading). –  Spot Feb 11 '11 at 10:38
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