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Consider the following basic class:

public class ConstructorExample {

    public ConstructorExample(){
        System.out.println("Constructor called.");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ConstructorExample ce = new ConstructorExample();
    }

}

When executing the above code, "Constructor called." is only printed once. Obviously, the constructor is called explicitly when the main method is called.

However, why isn't the constructor called when the JVM loads the class and starts the application initially?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No to execute main() method jvm doesn't construct Object of class, thats why main() method is static

it is being executed with

ConstructorExample ce = new ConstructorExample();

to confirm comment out below line

\\ConstructorExample ce = new ConstructorExample();

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So constructors are only ever called for non-static instances of a class? –  Mikaveli Feb 11 '11 at 11:07
3  
Constructor are only called when Object is constructed. –  Jigar Joshi Feb 11 '11 at 11:10
    
please read this piece from jls –  Jigar Joshi Feb 11 '11 at 11:12
    
Excellent, thank you. –  Mikaveli Feb 11 '11 at 11:18

Why would the JVM call the constructor at start ? "main" is a static method and it does not need an instance of ConstructorExample to be created.

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Why need to call main() method via an object ? Afterall, its a static method.
Purpose of main() method being static is JVM doesn't require to create any object for calling the main() method.

So, when the .class file is loaded by the JVM, the JVM looks for the main() method to run. When it sees one, it starts the program execution. After it, the constructor is called(here, in this case) when the object is being created and hence prints "Constructor called" only once.

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