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<?php
  $a = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');

  foreach ($a as &$v) { }
  foreach ($a as $v) { }

  print_r($a);
?>

I think it's a normal program but this is the output I am getting:

Array
(
    [0] => a
    [1] => b
    [2] => c
    [3] => c
)

Can someone please explain this to me?

share|improve this question
4  
What does "i think, its normal prog but web i saw op.........then ....ahh wat is it" mean? – Bart Kiers Feb 11 '11 at 13:01
1  
@Bart Kiers: He seems in a daze. – BoltClock Feb 11 '11 at 13:04
1  
possible duplicate of Unintentional destruction of php array element? – alexn Feb 11 '11 at 13:25
1  
This is the best explanation for this behavior: schlueters.de/blog/archives/141-References-and-foreach.html – Stefan Gehrig Feb 11 '11 at 13:26
1  
up vote 45 down vote accepted

This is well-documented PHP behaviour See the warning on the foreach page of php.net

Warning

Reference of a $value and the last array element remain even after the foreach loop. It is recommended to destroy it by unset().

$a = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');

foreach ($a as &$v) { }
unset($v);
foreach ($a as $v) { }

print_r($a);

EDIT

Attempt at a step-by-step guide to what is actually happening here

$a = array('a', 'b', 'c', 'd');
foreach ($a as &$v) { }   // 1st iteration $v is a reference to $a[0] ('a')
foreach ($a as &$v) { }   // 2nd iteration $v is a reference to $a[1] ('b')
foreach ($a as &$v) { }   // 3rd iteration $v is a reference to $a[2] ('c')
foreach ($a as &$v) { }   // 4th iteration $v is a reference to $a[3] ('d')

                          // At the end of the foreach loop,
                          //    $v is still a reference to $a[3] ('d')

foreach ($a as $v) { }    // 1st iteration $v (still a reference to $a[3]) 
                          //    is set to a value of $a[0] ('a').
                          //    Because it is a reference to $a[3], 
                          //    it sets $a[3] to 'a'.
foreach ($a as $v) { }    // 2nd iteration $v (still a reference to $a[3]) 
                          //    is set to a value of $a[1] ('b').
                          //    Because it is a reference to $a[3], 
                          //    it sets $a[3] to 'b'.
foreach ($a as $v) { }    // 3rd iteration $v (still a reference to $a[3]) 
                          //    is set to a value of $a[2] ('c').
                          //    Because it is a reference to $a[3], 
                          //    it sets $a[3] to 'c'.
foreach ($a as $v) { }    // 4th iteration $v (still a reference to $a[3]) 
                          //    is set to a value of $a[3] ('c' since 
                          //       the last iteration).
                          //    Because it is a reference to $a[3], 
                          //    it sets $a[3] to 'c'.
share|improve this answer
    
i know it!!! But whats wrong in my program ??? – Manish Trivedi Feb 11 '11 at 13:05
2  
@Manish Trivedi: See the Warning part for why this is happening. There's nothing wrong with your program. – BoltClock Feb 11 '11 at 13:05
    
Thanks..... i got it – Manish Trivedi Feb 11 '11 at 13:07
    
Very good explanation! Thank you :D I have to remember that one as a reference/dupe, all other answers about reference with foreach doesn't explain it as good as you did here! – Rizier123 Mar 27 '15 at 15:45
    
In your unset($v);, why is $v accessible outside the scope of foreachs? :o – nawfal Nov 20 '15 at 13:15

The first foreach loop does not make any change to the array, just as we would expect. However, it does cause $v to be assigned a reference to each of $a’s elements, so that, by the time the first loop is over, $v is, in fact, a reference to $a[2].

As soon as the second loop starts, $v is now assigned the value of each element. However, $v is already a reference to $a[2]; therefore, any value assigned to it will be copied automatically into the last element of the array!

Thus, during the first iteration, $a[2] will become zero, then one, and then one again, being effectively copied on to itself. To solve this problem, you should always unset the variables you use in your by-reference foreach loops—or, better yet, avoid using the former altogether.

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