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Edit: This didn't work because I had:

class Animal { ... }
class Horse extends Animal { ... }
class Unicorn extends **Animal** { ... }

Clearly, this is a typo, and Unicorn is supposed to extend Horse, not animal. And here, I thought I found a hole in Java's polymorphism!


Maybe it's just me, but this doesn't make sense. Let's assume I have two classes in Java, Horse and Unicorn (which is a subclass of Horse):

public class Horse {
  public String speak() {
    return "Wow, a talking horse!";
  }
}

public class Unicorn extends Horse {
  @Override
  public String speak() {
    return "Unicorns really exist?!";
  }
}

This code doesn't compile:

public Horse getHorse() {
  return new Unicorn(); // Doesn't compile
}

I get the compilation error "Cannot convert from Unicorn to Horse" under Eclipse using JRE or JSE 1.6.

Why doesn't it compile? Every unicorn is also a horse, and therefore, I'm returning a valid instance of horse ... aren't I?

My question is really about how polymorphism works in Java. I expect this to work. For what it's worth, this code compiles in .NET 2.0 (maybe that's why I expect it to work in Java, too).

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4  
Can you show us the exact compilation error if you can please? –  Simeon Feb 11 '11 at 15:48
    
It does compile when I copy / paste it though :). So +1 on "what is the exact compilation error". –  Kellindil Feb 11 '11 at 15:56
2  
Are Horse and Unicorn in your example method really THOSE Horse and Unicorn you've mentioned, or do you have others running around on your classpath and accidentally imported those? :-) –  Lukas Eder Feb 11 '11 at 16:00
1  
Boy, do I feel sheepish. I had Unicorn extending a different superclass in the Horse hierarchy, and that's why it wasn't compiling. –  ashes999 Feb 11 '11 at 16:06
3  
Aaaah, the good old horses and unicorns running around in the Java forest. I have about 70 of them in my project as well. They tend to get mixed up. That's why I started further subclassing them to Cindy, Swift, and Laura ... ;-) Have a nice weekend guys! –  Lukas Eder Feb 11 '11 at 16:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Did you write it exactly like this? because you can't have the parentheses in class definitions... e.g.

public class Horse() {

should be

public class Horse {

also

public class Unicorn extends Horse() {

should be

public class Unicorn extends Horse {
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that's a typo. I didn't write it with parenthesis. I also edited my question to add the @Override annotation which I use in Unicorn. –  ashes999 Feb 11 '11 at 15:49
    
Then, I agree with Simeon, we'll need the compilation error (and probably more code, because what you posted is correct) –  Lukas Eder Feb 11 '11 at 15:54
    
These are in the original post, pasted from Eclipse. –  ashes999 Feb 11 '11 at 15:55
    
What's the compilation error, what's the compilation error, what's the compilation error, what's the compilation error, what's the compilation error :) –  Lukas Eder Feb 11 '11 at 15:57
2  
Not wanting to rant or anything ( I actually upvote this answer ) , but marking this as correct will only cause more confusion to someone who had the same problem the op had, since this wasn't actually the correct solution, the OP was actually inheriting from a different class. –  OscarRyz Feb 11 '11 at 16:11

Works as expected:

See it in action

Probably your error, is you have both classes defined in the same source file.

There should be only one public class per file ( or as in my case, many non public )

But, without the exact error message is only speculation.

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Actually, I had them in different files. –  ashes999 Feb 11 '11 at 16:07
    
So, you found the solution right? Let's close this. –  OscarRyz Feb 11 '11 at 16:10
1  
Are you going to buy a license for your copy of Sublime Text? :-) –  James Schek Feb 11 '11 at 16:19
    
Don't know, I just installed it today ( that's why the screenshot ) ... I like it so far, but I'm very used to gVim ( <esc>:w is hardwired in my brain ) . Let's see. –  OscarRyz Feb 11 '11 at 16:22

This works:

public class Test {
    public static class Horse {
        public void speak() {
            System.out.println("I'm a horse");
        }
    }

    public static class Unicorn extends Horse {
        public void speak() {
            System.out.println("I'm a unicorn");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        getHorse().speak();
    }

    public static Horse getHorse() {
        return new Unicorn();
    }
}

It's not fundamentally different from what you claim to be doing, so your problem must be elsewhere.

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