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Hey guys, I'm trying to write a program that will take a positive number with a fractional part and round it up two places.For example 32.4851 would round to 32.49, and 32.4431 would round to 32.44.

I really am slightly lost on this one and was hoping you guys could help me out a little bit. I have written some code and need feedback (won't compile using gcc) using stdio.h and math.h

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

double x;

int rounded_x;

int main (void)
{
        printf ("Enter a number to be rounded \n\n\n\n\n");
        scanf ("&lf", &x);
        rounded_x=(int) (x+0.5);
        return 0;
}

double scale (double x, int n)
{
        double scale_factor;
        scale_factor = pow(10, n);
        return (x*scale_factor);  
}
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You said round-up but your example illustrates round-to-nearest. Which is it? –  David Heffernan Feb 11 '11 at 17:00
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6 Answers

The multiply by 100, divide by 100 solution is right. But this can end up with deceiving results because of the nature of floating-point datatypes. Nice round numbers in base-10, like "1.23" do not always translate to the base-2 floating point storage format. So you may find that rounding "1.2345" ends up as "1.23" as expected, but "1.1234" will end up as "1.11989589285982959295892859289582958295" or something crazy.

For this reason, if this kind of accuracy is important - especially if you are using these rounded numbers in any calculation, then you should consider operating in integers.

For example, when working with money, developers often work in cents instead of dollars. So, "$1.75" is represented as "175". This guarantees accuracy to the cent. Only divide by 100 when you want to display it to the user then.

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Pretty simple really. You just mutiply by 100, add 0.5, call round(), then divide by 100.

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Why add 0.5? For negative numbers that will bias the results towards zero. –  kauppi Feb 11 '11 at 16:06
1  
@kauppi: the question specifically states it is for positive numbers. –  KevenK Feb 11 '11 at 16:08
    
yes, it is for positive numbers. I'm not familiar with round () and this is my first time using math.h, how does this work/how would the code look? –  James Feb 11 '11 at 16:12
    
Yes, I did read the question and know that this was for positive numbers only and would work for this specific case. But may cause trouble later if the use-case for the function changes and the code is not re-evaluated. Also, as round() should do proper rounding, I'm interested in knowing if the 0.5 is really needed to workaround some corner cases (see tenfour's answer). –  kauppi Feb 11 '11 at 16:14
    
i'm using your post and tried something like this with no success (as you can see i'm an ultra beginner) –  James Feb 11 '11 at 16:38
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I think you need double ceil(double x) to get the smallest value or double floor(double x) to get the largest value, both included in math.h

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by the way

 scanf ("&lf", &x);

should be

 scanf ("%lf", &x);

i think..

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This depends on the characteristics of a specific implementation of a language; for roundup if digit 3 is 5 or more try adding 0.01 to the value then truncate with the result in a variable that has only 2 decimal places defined if possible.

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The simplest (but an ugly) code is:

 int main (void)

    {

    printf ("Enter a number to be rounded \n\n\n\n\n");

    scanf ("&lf", &x);

    rounded_x=((int)(x*100)/100.0);

    return 0;

    }
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Doesn't int conversion always round down? –  T.E.D. Feb 11 '11 at 16:03
    
Your code does not round properly, it truncates. –  kauppi Feb 11 '11 at 16:03
    
that usually ends up with wrong results. something like ... 5.53 * 100 = 552.99999999 ... (int) 552.99999999 = 552 ... 552 / 100 = 5.52 ... don't know if that is the proper example, but you get my point –  Raffael Feb 11 '11 at 16:04
    
oops forgot to add 0.5 my bad –  ardiyu07 Feb 11 '11 at 16:08
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