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The Java for C++ programmers tutorial says that (highlight is my own):

The keyword final is roughly equivalent to const in C++

What does "roughly" mean in this context? Aren't they exactly the same?

What are the differences, if any?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 103 down vote accepted

In C++ marking a member function const means it may be called on const instances. Java does not have an equivalent to this. E.g.:

class Foo {
public:
   void bar();
   void foo() const;
};

void test(const Foo& i) {
   i.foo(); //fine
   i.bar(); //error
}

Values can be assigned, once, later in Java, e.g.:

public class Foo {
   void bar() {
     final int a;
     a = 10;
   }
}

is legal in Java, but not C++ whereas:

public class Foo {
   void bar() {
     final int a;
     a = 10;
     a = 11; // Not legal, a has already been assigned a value.
   }
}

In both Java and C++ member variables may be final/const respectively. These need to be given a value by the time an instance of the class is finished being constructed.

In Java they must be set before the constructor has finished, this can be achieved in one of two ways:

public class Foo {
   private final int a;
   private final int b = 11;
   public Foo() {
      a = 10;
   }
}

In C++ you will need to use initialisation lists to give const members a value:

class Foo {
   const int a;
public:
   Foo() : a(10) {
      // Assignment here with = would not be legal
   }
};

In Java final can be used to mark things as non-overridable. C++ (pre-C++11) does not do this. E.g.:

public class Bar {
   public final void foo() {
   }
}

public class Error extends Bar {
   // Error in java, can't override
   public void foo() {
   }
}

But in C++:

class Bar {
public:
   virtual void foo() const {
   }
};

class Error: public Bar {
public:
   // Fine in C++
   virtual void foo() const {
   }
};

this is fine, because the semantics of marking a member function const are different. (You could also overload by only having the const on one of the member functions. (Note also that C++11 allows member functions to be marked final, see the C++11 update section)


C++11 update:

C++11 does in fact allow you to mark both classes and member functions as final, with identical semantics to the same feature in Java, for example in Java:

public class Bar {
   public final void foo() {
   }
}

public class Error extends Bar {
   // Error in java, can't override
   public void foo() {
   }
}

Can now be exactly written in C++11 as:

class Bar {
public:
  virtual void foo() final;
};

class Error : public Bar {
public:
  virtual void foo() final;
};

I had to compile this example with a pre-release of G++ 4.7. Note that this does not replace const in this case, but rather augments it, providing the Java-like behaviour that wasn't seen with the closest equivalent C++ keyword. So if you wanted a member function to be both final and const you would do:

class Bar {
public:
  virtual void foo() const final;
};

(The order of const and final here is required).

Previously there wasn't a direct equivalent of const member functions although making functions non-virtual would be a potential option albeit without causing an error at compile time.

Likewise the Java:

public final class Bar {
}

public class Error extends Bar {
}

becomes in C++11:

class Bar final {
};

class Error : public Bar {
};

(Previously private constructors was probably the closest you could get to this in C++)

Interestingly, in order to maintain backwards compatibility with pre-C++11 code final isn't a keyword in the usual way. (Take the trivial, legal C++98 example struct final; to see why making it a keyword would break code)

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1  
@awoodland This is a great answer. Can you elaborate on this? Thanks. –  WinWin Feb 11 '11 at 16:13
3  
You should make those methods virtual; otherwise, you are really not doing the same thing –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 11 '11 at 16:29
    
Good point, I meant to add a note about that when I wrote it –  Flexo Feb 11 '11 at 16:31
1  
In your last example, you what you have is legal, but it's worth mentioning that final int a; a = 10; a = 11; is not (that being the purpose of final as a variable modifier.) Also, final members a class can only be set at declaration time, or once in a constructor. –  corsiKa May 1 '11 at 2:38
1  
Note that C++0x adds the final member function decorator for this exact purpose. VC++ 2005, 2008, and 2010 already have this implemented, using the contextual keyword sealed rather than final. –  ildjarn May 10 '11 at 19:00

In Java the final keyword can be used for four things:

  • on a class or method to seal it (no subclasses / overriding allowed)
  • on a member variable to declare that is it can be set exactly once (I think this is what you are talking about)
  • on a variable declared in a method, to make sure that it can be set exactly once
  • on a method parameter, to declare that it cannot be modified within the method

One important thing is: A Java final member variable must be set exactly once! For example, in a constructor, field declaration, or intializer. (But you cannot set a final member variable in a method).

Another consequence of making a member variable final relates to the memory model, which is important if you work in a threaded environment.

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A const object can only call const methods, and is generally considered immutable.

const Person* person = myself;
person = otherPerson; //Valid... unless we declared it const Person* const!
person->setAge(20); //Invalid, assuming setAge isn't a const method (it shouldn't be)

A final object cannot be set to a new object, but it is not immutable - there is nothing stopping someone from calling any set methods.

final Person person = myself;
person = otherPerson; //Invalid
person.setAge(20); //Valid!

Java has no inherent way of declaring objects immutable; you need to design the class as immutable yourself.

When the variable is a primitive type, final/const work the same.

const int a = 10; //C++
final int a = 10; //Java
a = 11; //Invalid in both languages
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3  
This is a great answer, too (like many others here). Unfortunately, I can only accept one answer. :) –  WinWin Feb 11 '11 at 16:39

Javas final works only on primitive types and references, never on object instances themselves where the const keyword works on anything.

compare const list<int> melist; with final List<Integer> melist; the first makes it impossible to modify the list while the later only stops you from assigning a new list to melist.

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Java final is equivalent to C++ const on primitive value types.

With Java reference types, the final keyword is equivalent to a const pointer... i.e.

//java
final int finalInt = 5;
final MyObject finalReference = new MyObject();

//C++
const int constInt = 5;
MyObject * const constPointer = new MyObject();
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You have some great answers here already, but one point that seemed worth adding: const in C++ is commonly used to prevent other parts of the program changing the state of objects. As has been pointed out, final in java can't do this (except for primitives) - it just prevents the reference from being changed to a different object. But if you are using a Collection, you can prevent changes to your objects by using the static method

 Collection.unmodifiableCollection( myCollection ) 

This returns a Collection reference that gives read-access to the elements, but throws an exception if modifications are attempted, making it a bit like const in C++

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According to wikipedia:

  • In C++, a const field is not only protected from being reassigned, but there is the additional limitation that only const methods can be called on it and it can only be passed as the const argument of other methods.
  • Non-static inner classes can freely access any field of the enclosing class, final or not.
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I am guessing it says "roughly" because the meaning of const in C++ gets complicated when you talk about pointers, i.e. constant pointers vs. pointers to constant objects. Since there are no "explicit" pointers in Java, final does not have these issues.

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Aside from having certain and subtle multi-threading properties, variables declared final don't need to be initialized on declaration!

i.e. This is valid in Java:

// declare the variable
final int foo;

{
    // do something...

    // and then initialize the variable
    foo = ...;
}

This would not be valid if written with C++'s const.

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