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I need to validate my log files:

-All new log lines shall start with date.

-This date will respect the ISO 8601 standard. Example: 2011-02-03 12:51:45,220Z -

Using shell script, I can validate it looping on each line and verifying the date pattern. The code is below:

#!/bin/bash

processLine(){
    # get all args
    line="$@"    
    result=`echo $line | egrep "[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2} [012][0-9]:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2},[0-9]{3}Z" -a -c`    
    if [ "$result" == "0" ]; then
        echo "The log is not with correct date format: "
        echo $line
        exit 1
    fi

}


# Make sure we get file name as command line argument
if [ "$1" == "" ]; then
   echo "You must enter a logfile"
   exit 0
else
    file="$1"
    # make sure file exist and readable
    if [ ! -f $file ]; then
        echo "$file : does not exists"
        exit 1
    elif [ ! -r $file ]; then
        echo "$file: can not read"
        exit 2
    fi
fi


# Set loop separator to end of line
BAKIFS=$IFS
IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b")
exec 3<&0
exec 0<"$file"
while read -r line
do
    # use $line variable to process line in processLine() function
    processLine $line
done
exec 0<&3

# restore $IFS which was used to determine what the field separators are
IFS=$BAKIFS
echo SUCCESS

But, there is a problem. Some logs contains stacktraces or something that uses more than one line, in other words, stacktrace is an example, it can be anything. Stacktrace example:

2011-02-03 12:51:45,220Z [ERROR] - File not found
java.io.FileNotFoundException: fred.txt
        at java.io.FileInputStream.<init>(FileInputStream.java)
        at java.io.FileInputStream.<init>(FileInputStream.java)
        at ExTest.readMyFile(ExTest.java:19)
        at ExTest.main(ExTest.java:7)
        ...

will not pass with my script, but is valid! Then, if I run my script passing a log file with stacktraces for example, my script will failed, because it loops line by line.

I have the correct pattern and I need to validade the logger date format, but I don't have wrong date format pattern to skip lines.

I don't know how I can solve this problem. Does somebody can help me?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
How will you distinguish between a valid non-date line and an invalid date? For example, does an invalid date always start at the beginning of a line with a numeric character and a valid non-date line always start with an alphabetic or whitespace character? –  Dennis Williamson Feb 11 '11 at 17:24
    
Valid and invalid logger date format always start at the beginning of a line. I just know the correct date format. There can be n invalid date formats :( –  joaosavio Feb 11 '11 at 18:00

4 Answers 4

You need to anchor your search for the date to the start of the line (otherwise the date could appear anywhere in the line - not just at the beginning).

The following snippet will loop over all lines that do not begin with a valid date. You still have to determine if the lines constitute errors or not.

DATEFMT='^[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2} [012][0-9]:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2},[0-9]{3}Z'
egrep -v ${DATEFMT} /path/to/log | while read LINE; do
   echo ${LINE} # did not begin with date.
done
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, you've improved my validation and code with your regex, but the problem is not solved yet. "echo ${LINE} # did not begin with date." Here it'll contain right code (stacktrace for example), but invalid date formats too in the beginning of a line, which pattern format are unknown. This validation that I don't know how to do. –  joaosavio Feb 11 '11 at 18:13

So just (silently) discard a single stack trace. In somewhat verbose bash:

STATE=idle

while read -r line; do
    case $STATE in
    idle)
        if [[ $line =~ ^java\..*Exception ]]; then
            STATE=readingexception
        else
            processLine "$line"
        fi
        ;;

    readingexception)
        if ! [[ $line =~ ^' '*'at ' ]]; then
            STATE=idle
            processLine "$line"
        fi
        ;;

    *)
        echo "Urk! internal error [$STATE]" >&2
        exit 1
        ;;
    esac
done <logfile

This relies on processLine not continuing on error, else you will need to track a tad more state to avoid two consecutive stack traces.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But "Some logs contains stacktraces or something that uses more than one line", in other words, stacktrace is an example, it can anything –  joaosavio Feb 14 '11 at 10:56

This makes 2 assumptions.

  1. lines that begin with whitespace are continuations of previous lines. we're matching a leading space, or a leading tab.
  2. lines that have non-whitespace characters starting at ^ are new log lines.

If a line matching #2 doesn't match the date format, we have an error, so print the error, and include the line number.

count=0

processLine() {
     count=$(( count + 1 ))
     line="$@"

     result=$( echo $line | egrep '^[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2} [012][0-9]:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2},[0-9]{3}Z' -a -c )

     if (( $result == 0 )); then

        # if result = 0, then my line did not start with the proper date.
        # if the line starts with whitespace, then it may be a continuation
        # of a multi-line log entry (like a java stacktrace)

        continues=$( echo $line | egrep "^ |^   " -a -c )

        if (( $continues == 0 )); then

                # if we got here, then the line did not start with a proper date,
                # AND the line did not start with white space.  This is a bad line.

                echo "The line is not with correct date format: "
                echo "$count: $line"
                exit 1
        fi
    fi
}
share|improve this answer

Create a condition to check if the line starts with a date. If not, skip that line as it is part of a multi-line log.

processLine(){
    # get all args
    line="$@"    
    result=`echo $line | egrep "[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{2}-[0-9]{2} [012][0-9]:[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2},[0-9]{3}Z" -a -c`    
    if [ "$result" == "0" ]; then
        echo "Log entry is multi-lined - continuing."
    fi

}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hey, the problem is that this approach will skip INVALID date format too –  joaosavio Feb 11 '11 at 17:19

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