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I often want to grab the first element of an IEnumerable<T> in .net, and I haven't found a nice way to do it. The best I've come up with is:

foreach(Elem e in enumerable) {
  // do something with e
  break;
}

Yuck! So, is there a nice way to do this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 108 down vote accepted

If you can use LINQ you can use:

var e = enumerable.First();

This will throw an exception though if enumerable is empty: in which case you can use:

var e = enumerable.FirstOrDefault();

FirstOrDefault() will return default(T) if the enumerable is empty, which will be null for reference types or the default 'zero-value' for value types.

If you can't use LINQ, then your approach is technically correct and no different than creating an enumerator using the GetEnumerator and MoveNext methods to retrieve the first result (this example assumes enumerable is an IEnumerable<Elem>):

Elem e = myDefault;
using (IEnumerator<Elem> enumer = enumerable.GetEnumerator()) {
    if (enumer.MoveNext()) e = enumer.Current;
}

Joel Coehoorn mentioned .Single() in the comments; this will also work, if you are expecting your enumerable to contain exactly one element - however it will throw an exception if it is either empty or larger than one element. There is a corresponding SingleOrDefault() method that covers this scenario in a similar fashion to FirstOrDefault(). However, David B explains that SingleOrDefault() may still throw an exception in the case where the enumerable contains more than one item.

Edit: Thanks Marc Gravell for pointing out that I need to dispose of my IEnumerator object after using it - I've edited the non-LINQ example to display the using keyword to implement this pattern.

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You should be using enumer - but other than that, good ;-p –  Marc Gravell Jan 30 '09 at 22:06
1  
Thanks Marc - edited. =) –  Erik Forbes Jan 30 '09 at 22:35
2  
Worth pointing out that SingleOrDefault will return 1) The only item if there is only one item. 2) null if there are no items. 3) throw an exception if there's more than one item. –  David B May 6 '11 at 2:26
    
Good call David B - added a note. –  Erik Forbes Oct 21 '13 at 18:55

Just in case you're using .NET 2.0 and don't have access to LINQ:

 static T First<T>(IEnumerable<T> items)
 {
     using(IEnumerator<T> iter = items.GetEnumerator())
     {
         iter.MoveNext();
         return iter.Current;
     }
 }

This should do what you're looking for...it uses generics so you to get the first item on any type IEnumerable.

Call it like so:

List<string> items = new List<string>() { "A", "B", "C", "D", "E" };
string firstItem = First<string>(items);

Or

int[] items = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
int firstItem = First<int>(items);

You could modify it readily enough to mimic .NET 3.5's IEnumerable.ElementAt() extension method:

static T ElementAt<T>(IEnumerable<T> items, int index)
{
    using(IEnumerator<T> iter = items.GetEnumerator())
    {
        for (int i = 0; i <= index; i++, iter.MoveNext()) ;
        return iter.Current;
    }
}

Calling it like so:

int[] items = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
int elemIdx = 3;
int item = ElementAt<int>(items, elemIdx);

Of course if you do have access to LINQ, then there are plenty of good answers posted already...

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You should be using iter –  Marc Gravell Jan 30 '09 at 22:07
    
Oops, of course you're right, thanks. I've corrected my examples. –  BenAlabaster Jan 30 '09 at 22:12
    
Iterators are disposable? Didn't know that... –  Paul Betts Jan 30 '09 at 22:20
    
If you're on 2.0, you don't have var either. –  recursive Jan 30 '09 at 22:37
1  
Well I guess if you wanna get finicky I'll declare them properly :P –  BenAlabaster Jan 30 '09 at 22:44

Well, you didn't specify which version of .Net you're using.

Assuming you have 3.5, another way is the ElementAt method:

var e = enumerable.ElementAt(0);
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ElementAt(0), nice and simple. –  JMD Jan 30 '09 at 21:25

FirstOrDefault ?

Elem e = enumerable.FirstOrDefault();
//do something with e
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Use FirstOrDefault or a foreach loop as already mentioned. Manually fetching an enumerator and calling Current should be avoided. foreach will dispose your enumerator for you if it implements IDisposable. When calling MoveNext and Current you have to dispose it manually (if aplicable).

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1  
What evidence is there that the enumerator should be avoided? Performance tests on my machine indicate that it has an approximate 10% performance gain over foreach. –  BenAlabaster Jan 30 '09 at 22:48
    
It depends on what you‘re enumerating over. An Erumerator could close connection to the Database, fush and close file handle, release some locked objects, etc. Not disposing an enumerator of some integer list won’t be harmfull, I guess. –  Mouk Jan 31 '09 at 13:24

If your IEnumerable doesn't expose it's <T> and Linq fails, you can write a method using reflection:

public static T GetEnumeratedItem<T>(Object items, int index) where T : class
{
  T item = null;
  if (items != null)
  {
    System.Reflection.MethodInfo mi = items.GetType()
      .GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
    if (mi != null)
    {
      object o = mi.Invoke(items, null);
      if (o != null)
      {
        System.Reflection.MethodInfo mn = o.GetType()
          .GetMethod("MoveNext");
        if (mn != null)
        {
          object next = mn.Invoke(o, null);
          while (next != null && next.ToString() == "True")
          {
            if (index < 1)
            {
              System.Reflection.PropertyInfo pi = o
                .GetType().GetProperty("Current");
              if (pi != null) item = pi
                .GetValue(o, null) as T;
              break;
            }
            index--;
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return item;
}
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