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I have a file that I believe to be an XML type file but when I change the extension to TXT and open it through a text editor I get

.�2�'��7cõ’¥¶_ä™πUUUN?¯ÖÀuóbåqW÷õxó_i}Ï08Y‚û¡d≈§•§è«/Óÿ`*∆cÅ·x…ëë«Öµ¶fi—

Is there anyway to determine what kind of encoding is being used?

EDIT:

The file is a ptx file used for legal deposition software. I am trying to create a reader for the mac.

This is contents of the file from a hex editor.

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What is your operating system, and the file extension? –  Wige Feb 11 '11 at 19:11
    
What makes you think that this should be an xml file? And since the file is binary you might want to post the beginning of the file in hex instead of text. –  CodesInChaos Feb 11 '11 at 21:10
    
I have Windows XP and OS X 10.6 and the file extension is PTX –  Ben Feb 11 '11 at 21:10
    
How do I post the hex? –  Ben Feb 11 '11 at 21:11
    
Open the file with a hex editor and copy what it displays. And a bit of background on what the file is wouldn't hurt. Which program created it? What kind of data does it contain?... –  CodesInChaos Feb 11 '11 at 21:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Doesn't look like an common charset. Almost any encoding preserves ASCII characters in some form.

So I see a few possibilities:

  1. The file in a compressed text/xml file
  2. The file in a encrypted text/xml file
  3. It's a binary file format
  4. It's obfuscated

Now if we look at it we see sequences with repeated characters like "UUU" and "ëë" occur quite often. Since encrypted data appears completely random this makes the second option unlikely.

What makes you think that this should be an xml file? And since the file is binary you might want to post the beginning of the file in hex instead of text.

Looking at your hex-dump I'm pretty sure it's not encrypted. And sequences like "01 00" are typical for an uncompressed binary format. So that's my best guess.


Writing a parser from just a sample file is rather hard. First thing I'd try is looking for a format specification on the net.

If you try to figure out a file format you can either start reversing the application creating them(That's rather hard if the program is compiled to assembly, and rather easy for byte-code such as java or .net use).

Or you start with a simple file. Make minimal changes to it in the program and compare the differences in the file. That's a lot of work, and only possible for rather simple file formats.


I couldn't find a specification when searching a bit. And there seems to be only a single implementation. You could try contacting the company who created it, but I somehow doubt they'll help. So I guess you need to reverse engineer the format yourself. That's probably not easy and quite a bit of work. Good look.

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Is there any way to find out what encryption is used and decrypt it? –  Ben Feb 11 '11 at 21:09
    
@Ben The byte frequencies indicate that the file isn't encrypted. –  CodesInChaos Feb 11 '11 at 21:32

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