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I have a datarow that I pass around and do things with, and would like to strongly type it, but don't need to strongly-type the table itself.

Is there a tool that will autogenerate a strongly-typed row with isnull methods and such?

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Isn't this what the entity framework is supposed to accomplish? –  Neil N Feb 12 '11 at 4:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is worthwhile since you could get compile time checking with strongly typed DataRow/DataSet.

The code below (just a sample) shows how I do it. I have a tool that generates all of the classes from Database information, in particular the output of stored procedures. So I have a stored procedure that returns a result set whose fields map to the properties of the PostDtw class below.

The tool (with source) is available on my blog. It also generates DataReaders wrappers in a similar manner. You can get the tool from here Data Access Layer CodeGen

The "Main" method below shows how you'd use the class. Notice how in the foreach loop you're accessing properties of a class but behind the scenes the property getter is using a DataRow.

The methods "GetPosts1" and "GetPosts2" shows how you'd basically use a DataTable but "convert" it to an

IEnumerable<PostDtw>

. GetPosts1 essentially uses the same instance, while GetPosts2 creates a new instance for each row.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Data;

namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      var posts = GetPosts1();
      foreach (var post in posts)
      {
        Console.WriteLine(post.PostId);
        Console.WriteLine(post.PostTitle);
        Console.WriteLine(post.PostSlug);
        Console.WriteLine(post.PostDate);
      }
    }

    static IEnumerable<PostDtw> GetPosts1()
    {
      DataTable postsDt = GetPostsDataTable();
      PostDtw postDtw = new PostDtw();

      foreach(DataRow row in postsDt.Rows)
      {
        postDtw.DataRow = row;
        yield return postDtw;
      }        
    }

    static IEnumerable<PostDtw> GetPosts2()
    {
      DataTable postsDt = GetPostsDataTable();
      foreach (DataRow row in postsDt.Rows)
        yield return new PostDtw(row);
    }

    static DataTable GetPostsDataTable()
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
  }

  /// <summary>
  ///This is the Base Class for all DataTable Wrappers
  /// </summary>
  public class BaseDataTableWrapper
  {
    public DataRow DataRow { get; set; }

    public BaseDataTableWrapper()
    {
    }

    public BaseDataTableWrapper(DataRow row)
      : this()
    {
      DataRow = row;
    }
  }

  #region [GetPost]

  /// <summary>
  ///This class is a wrapper around a DataTable,
  ///Associated with the stored procedure - GetPost
  ///This class provides a strongly typed interface to access data from the DataTable
  ///containing the result of the given stored procedure.
  /// </summary>
  public sealed class PostDtw : BaseDataTableWrapper
  {
    public Int32 PostId { get { return (Int32)DataRow[0]; } set { DataRow[0] = value; } }
    public DateTime PostDate { get { return (DateTime)DataRow[1]; } set { DataRow[1] = value; } }
    public String PostSlug { get { return (String)DataRow[2]; } set { DataRow[2] = value; } }
    public Int32 UserId { get { return (Int32)DataRow[3]; } set { DataRow[3] = value; } }
    public String PostTitle { get { return (String)DataRow[4]; } set { DataRow[4] = value; } }
    public String PostText { get { return (String)DataRow[5]; } set { DataRow[5] = value; } }
    public Boolean PostIsPublished { get { return (Boolean)DataRow[6]; } set { DataRow[6] = value; } }
    public Boolean PostIsPublic { get { return (Boolean)DataRow[7]; } set { DataRow[7] = value; } }
    public String PostTitleImg { get { if (DataRow[8] != DBNull.Value) return (String)DataRow[8]; else return default(String); } set { DataRow[8] = value; } }

    public PostDtw()
      : base()
    {
    }

    public PostDtw(DataRow row)
      : base(row)
    {
    }
  }

  #endregion [GetPost]

}
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In my opinion is is worthwhile to create a strongly-typed class for ADO data types. There are two ways you can do this:

  1. Hand-code a subclass of DataRow or whatever that encapsulates the behavior you want.
  2. Write an XSD file of your data and let Visual Studio construct strongly-typed classes.

The advantage of the first method is that it provides a custom API exposing exactly what you want. The second method is often faster.

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With the second method, you're not just restricted to DataSets (which carry more overhead that DataTable and DataRow). You can also instantiate DataTable and DataRow objects of your table. 2nd method is highly preferred. –  user3308043 May 27 '14 at 20:36

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