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I'm currently self-teaching myself C# and I'm a bit new at programming so apologies in advance if this is covered in another topic (I tried searching).

I've been trying to make a generic worker / thread class that takes in a method which specifically wraps around a long set of procedural steps. The idea is to be able to pause/resume it a manner similar to setting breakpoints to pause/unpause in Visual Studio. To provide context, I'm mostly working with automation with an ASP.NET and XAML WPF interface (XAML at the moment).

My understanding is that I need to use delegates of some sort but I'm looking for a very simple example in plain English. The examples I found are a completely different scope and I have a hard time following the provided solutions in other contexts.

From other examples on MSDN and Stackoverflow, the "Task" worker class is what I have so far, but I'm a bit at a loss on where to on DoDelegatedMethod and my constructor. What I'm trying to do here is to instantiate a Task object, pass in a delegated method on new instantiation, create a new thread, and marry the passed in method to the thread.

The reason why I want a general "Task" is so I can manage specific methods generically instead of having to write a different "DoWork" method for each instance.

Is this the right approach?

class Task
{
    private ManualResetEvent _shutdownFlag = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private ManualResetEvent _pauseFlag = new ManualResetEvent(true);
    private delegate void MyDelegate();

    Thread _thread;

    public Task() { }

    public Task(MyDelegate d = new MyDelegate(DoStuff)) // ERROR
    {
        _thread = new Thread(DoDelegatedMethod); // ERROR
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        _thread.Start();
    }

    public void Resume()
    {
        _pauseFlag.Set(); ;
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _shutdownFlag.Set();
        _pauseFlag.Set();
        _thread.Join();
    }

    private void DoDelegatedMethod(MyDelegate d)
    {
        do
        {
            d();
        }
        while (!_shutdownFlag.WaitOne(0));
    }

    // This does nothing but spin forever until I force it to stop
    public void Spin()
    {
        do
        {
            // MessageBox.Show("test");
            _pauseFlag.WaitOne(Timeout.Infinite);
        }
        while (!_shutdownFlag.WaitOne(0));
        //MessageBox.Show("thread over");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'd probably go about this a tad differently and make this a generic class (class Task<T> where T : ITaskWorker) then create the ITaskWorker that defines the interfaces necessary for task to run, e.g. void DoWork() or something similar) – Brad Christie Feb 11 '11 at 20:55
up vote 5 down vote accepted

new Thread() takes a ThreadStart (or ParameterisedThreadStart) argument, and your DoDelegatedMethod callback doesn't have the right signature for ThreadStart. So you need to write something like this:

ThreadStart method = new ThreadStart(() => DoDelegatedMethod(d));
_thread = new Thread(method);

This creates an anonymous callback (the () => DoDelegatedMethod(d) bit) which when run will call DoDelegatedMethod with the delegate d (which is 'captured' by the anonmyous method). Now you pass this anonymous callback to the Thread constructor, so when the thread runs, it will call the anonymous callback, which will in turn call DoDelegatedMethod(d). Effectively the lambda adapts DoDelegatedMethod to the ThreadStart signature.

Another way to do this would be to change DoDelegatedMethod to take no arguments, and store d as a member field of the Task class which DoDelegateMethod would access.

Also, the reason you get an error on your constructor is that default values can only be of a limited set of types, and delegates aren't one of them (only types that are allowed in attributes, like int, long, string and Type are permitted). Use an overload instead:

public Task() : this(new MyDelegate(DoStuff)) { ... }
public Task(MyDelegate d) { ... }

Note you may still get an error if DoStuff is an instance method of Task -- it's not clear. Personally I think having a default delegate for Task to run is a bit of an odd design, so you may just want to get rid of the default constructor.


Following the discussion in the comments I thought it was worth summarising the suggested revisions to the Task class:

public class Task
{
  private readonly Action _action;
  // other members as before

  // default constructor removed

  public Task(Action action)
  {
    _action = action;
  }

  public void Start()
  {
    ThreadStart ts = new ThreadStart(DoDelegatedMethod);
    _thread = new Thread(ts);
    _thread.Start();
  }

  private void DoDelegatedMethod()
  {
    do
    {
      _action();
    }
    while (!_shutdownFlag.WaitOne(0));  
  }

  // other members as before
}

And the usage:

Task task = new Task(this.AutomatedTasks);
task.Start();

private void AutomatedTasks() { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
If I remove the default constructor, do I put this stuff in the Task.Start method (so starting the task makes a thread and assigns delegated method)? public void Start() { ThreadStart method = new ThreadStart(() => DoDelegatedMethod(d)); _thread = new Thread(method); // ERROR _thread.Start(); } – Wibble Feb 11 '11 at 22:21
    
You'll still have the constructor that takes a delegate, and you could still put the new Thread(...) call in there. But this is wasteful if someone creates a Task and then never Starts it, so putting it in Task.Start is probably better anyway. In this case you will need to save the delegate d in a member field so that it's available in the Start method. – itowlson Feb 11 '11 at 22:30
    
Starting to make sense bit by bit! How do I pass in the delegated function into the Task class? For example, in the MainWindow() XAML: Task myTask = new Task(); ... private void AutomatedTasks(){...} AutomatedTasks contains all the stuff I want managed by thread I can't seem to get this to work syntactically in the Task class, do I make private delegate void _myDelegate(); and have it fed through public void Start(_myDelegate) (Syntax fails on the above statement.) – Wibble Feb 11 '11 at 22:41
    
Your MyDelegate type would need to be public (missed that!) -- and you might as well just get rid of MyDelegate and use the built-in Action type to be honest. So your constructor would be public Task(Action action), and your MainWindow code would call it as new Task(this.AutomatedTasks). Your Task class will contain a private readonly Action _action; and the constructor will set _action = action;, and Start will call new ThreadStart(() => DoDelegatedMethod(_action)), and DoDelegatedMethod will take an Action instead of a MyDelegate. – itowlson Feb 11 '11 at 22:47
    
Actually, now we're storing the delegate in a member field, DoDelegatedAction doesn't need to take it as an argument -- and can therefore be a ThreadStart by itself, without needing the anonymous adapter callback. I've updated the answer to try to put this all in one place. – itowlson Feb 11 '11 at 22:55

You may find good implementation of Task Pool manager here www.codeproject.com/KB/threads/smartthreadpool.aspx

smartthreadpool allows to send in pool any task, but you have to add Pause\Start functions to it.

share|improve this answer
    
A comment: when he says 'd is captured', what is going on is a closure. – mozillanerd Feb 12 '11 at 3:25

I would model this a List which I would enumerate like you would any other list and use 'yield' at the en of the enumerator.

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