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I have a SELECT query like this:

SELECT id_default_value, id_type FROM ntg_attribute, ntg_module_attribute 
WHERE ntg_attribute.id_module_attribute = ntg_module_attribute.id;

This returns 2 columns, id_default_value and id_type. I'd like to then use this data as the basis of an INSERT query into another table, ntg_default_value, using id_default_value as the key, and id_type as the inserted value.

The following is nearly there, but not quite:

INSERT INTO ntg_default_value (id, id_type) 
SELECT id_default_value, id_type FROM ntg_attribute, ntg_module_attribute 
WHERE ntg_attribute.id_module_attribute = ntg_module_attribute.id;

This gives me:

ERROR:  duplicate key value violates unique constraint "pk_ntg_default_value"

Is what I'm trying to do actually possible? If so, how do I construct the query?

(PostgreSQL 8.4.6)

share|improve this question
    
Its possible. The error says the primary key already exists and the new row has a duplicate key. You need to construct a proper condition that will only select "new" rows that will not duplicate your PK. A common idiom is insert into foo (...) select ... from bar ... where not exists (select 1 from foo where bar.id = foo.pk) - will exclude rows where PK is already there. –  nate c Feb 11 '11 at 21:35
    
Why are you duplicating data into another table? –  blthiewes Feb 12 '11 at 16:53
    
@blthiewes I'm not duplicating the data, I'm migrating it. After the INSERT, I'm going to delete id_type from ntg_attribute. –  Jamie Bullock Feb 12 '11 at 18:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The name of the constraint 'pk_ntg_default_value' probably means you are violating the primary key constraint of the table ntg_default_value.

Depending on your requirements you can either take away the primary key constraint. Or you can expand it to include both id & id_type if it doesn't already and add a GROUP BY to your query, if necessary, to prevent duplicate id_devault_value & id_type pairs. Your query becomes then :

INSERT INTO ntg_default_value (id, id_type)
SELECT id_default_value, id_type 
FROM ntg_attribute, ntg_module_attribute 
WHERE ntg_attribute.id_module_attribute = 
      ntg_module_attribute.id 
GROUP BY id_default_value, id_type
share|improve this answer
    
That worked like a charm, thanks! –  Jamie Bullock Feb 13 '11 at 11:39

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