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Is it possible to generate a global call graph of an application?

Basically I am trying to find the most important class of an application.

I am looking for options for Java.

I have tried Doxy Gen, but it only generates inheritance graphs.

My current script:

#! /bin/bash

echo "digraph G
{"
find $1 -name \*.class |
    sed s/\\.class$// |
    while read x
    do
        javap -v $x | grep " = class" | sed "s%.*// *%\"$x\" -> %" | sed "s/$1\///" | sed "s/-> \(.*\)$/-> \"\1\"/"
    done
echo "}"
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of How to generate a Java call graph –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 11 '11 at 21:42
    
"Most important", probably not, but this would probably expose classes with too much functionality, I think. –  Stefan Kendall Feb 11 '11 at 21:43
2  
@Sean, it may be a duplicate question but none of the answers there address it. –  Peter Taylor Feb 11 '11 at 21:46
    
@Peter I know, and that's the problem with the "duplicate question" on this site. But it is the policy to close dupes. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 11 '11 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

javap -v and a bit of perl will get you dependencies between classes. You can make your parser slightly more sophisticated and get dependencies between methods.

Update: or if you have either a *nix or cygwin you can get a list of dependencies as

find com/akshor/pjt33/image -name \*.class |
  sed s/\\.class$// |
    while read x
    do
      javap -v $x | grep " = class" | sed "s%.*// *%$x -> %"
    done

Add a header and a footer and you can pass it to dot to render a graph. If you just want to know which classes are used by the most other classes, as your question implies, then

find com/akshor/pjt33/image -name \*.class |
  sed s/\\.class$// |
    while read x
    do
      javap -v $x | grep " = class" | sed "s%.*// *%%"
    done |
      sort | uniq -c | sort -n
share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure this can help. And I know close to nothing about Perl. I know its a shame. –  Tiago Veloso Feb 11 '11 at 22:05
    
@Tiago, you can read input and apply regular expression in Java too, it's just rather more verbose. –  Peter Taylor Feb 12 '11 at 10:30
    
I'll give this a try. I am guessing that this command will look for files in com/akshor/pjt33/image with the *.classextension, but shouldn't it be *.java? I was under the impression the javap command would read java files and not class files. –  Tiago Veloso Feb 12 '11 at 15:02
    
Never mind. I am almost done with this, I am tweaking your bash script to my needs. –  Tiago Veloso Feb 12 '11 at 16:10
    
@Peter: I am getting some weird symbols like [Z and [B. I have added the current version of the script I am building on my question. –  Tiago Veloso Feb 12 '11 at 16:54

For advanced code analysis you might wanna have a look at http://www.moosetechnology.org/

Cheers
Thomas

(edit: moved down here by general request, See: How to generate a Java call graph)

share|improve this answer
    
LOL... you beat me to the punch (+1) –  Manrico Corazzi Feb 11 '11 at 21:41
1  
I don't think you understand what the OP is looking for. –  Stefan Kendall Feb 11 '11 at 21:43
    
@Manrico scusa :) –  Thomas Rawyler Feb 11 '11 at 22:01
    
I have seen that question, but it does not what I am looking for. –  Tiago Veloso Feb 11 '11 at 22:01
    
@Tiago and what about Moose? I used this tool to analyse projects at work. –  Thomas Rawyler Feb 11 '11 at 22:04

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