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I wish to do exactly what rcond does in MATLAB/Octave using LAPACK from C. The MATLAB manual tells me dgecon is used, and that is uses a 1-based norm.

I wrote a simple test program for an extremely simple case; [1,1; 1,0] For this input matlab and octave gives me 0.25 using rcond and 1/cond(x,1), but in the case using LAPACK, this sample program prints 0.0. For other cases, such as identity, it prints the correct value.

Since MATLAB is supposely actually using this routine with success, what am I doing wrong? I'm trying to decipher what Octave does, with little success as its wrapped in

#include <stdio.h>

extern void dgecon_(const char *norm, const int *n, const double *a, 
     const int *lda, const double *anorm, double *rcond, double *work, 
     int *iwork, int *info, int len_norm);

int main()
{
    int i, info, n, lda;
    double anorm, rcond;

    double w[8] = { 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 };

    int iw[2] = { 0,0 };

    double x[4] = { 1, 1, 1, 0 };
    anorm = 2.0; /* maximum column sum, computed manually */
    n = 2;
    lda = 2;

    dgecon_("1", &n, x, &lda, &anorm, &rcond, w, iw, &info, 1);

    if (info != 0) fprintf(stderr, "failure with error %d\n", info);
    printf("%.5e\n", rcond);
    return 0;
}

Compiled with cc testdgecon.c -o testdgecon -llapack; ./testdgecon

share|improve this question
    
can you use clapack instead? –  Anycorn Feb 11 '11 at 22:14
    
I'd really prefer to use something which is widely spread, to cause as little bother for everyone else working with the code. Since I was only needed a couple of routines I thought some manual declarations would be rather painless. I define widely spread as available in the standard Debian repos. –  Mikael Öhman Feb 11 '11 at 23:35
1  
Just tried the fortran analog of your code using gfortran+netlib lapack and the PGI compiler + ACML (on a different machine). Both give consistent answers and in the case you mentioned they both give zero. Are you really sure that Matlab's cond() and LAPACK's dgecon() are supposed to produce the same thing? –  ev-br Feb 12 '11 at 0:50
    
Zhenya, thank you for your comment. It helped me in the right direction. On closer inspection i found that matlab also references DGETRF. I have gotten it working with the answer i posted. –  Mikael Öhman Feb 12 '11 at 1:47
2  
As a semi-offtopic comment, the latest version of lapack (3.3) finally contains official C bindings. –  janneb Feb 12 '11 at 7:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I found the answer to me own question.

The matrix is must be LU-decomposed before it is sent to dgecon. This seems very logical since one often wants to solve the system after checking the condition, in which case there is no need to decompose the matrix twice. The same idea goes for the norm which is computed separately.

The following code is all the necessary parts the compute the reciprocal condition number with LAPACK.

#include "stdio.h"

extern int dgecon_(const char *norm, const int *n, double *a, const int *lda, const double *anorm, double *rcond, double *work, int *iwork, int *info, int len);
extern int dgetrf_(const int *m, const int *n, double *a, const int *lda, int *lpiv, int *info);
extern double dlange_(const char *norm, const int *m, const int *n, const double *a, const int *lda, double *work, const int norm_len);

int main()
{
    int i, info, n, lda;
    double anorm, rcond;

    int iw[2];
    double w[8];
    double x[4] = {7,3,-9,2 };
    n = 2;
    lda = 2;

    /* Computes the norm of x */
    anorm = dlange_("1", &n, &n, x, &lda, w, 1);

    /* Modifies x in place with a LU decomposition */
    dgetrf_(&n, &n, x, &lda, iw, &info);
    if (info != 0) fprintf(stderr, "failure with error %d\n", info);

    /* Computes the reciprocal norm */
    dgecon_("1", &n, x, &lda, &anorm, &rcond, w, iw, &info, 1);
    if (info != 0) fprintf(stderr, "failure with error %d\n", info);

    printf("%.5e\n", rcond);
    return 0;
}
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