Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've created a Google map that loads a KML file as an overlay. It is a map of trailheads for say hiking. What I'm trying to figure out now is how to create a search that will allow visitors to search within the KML's data and show the relevant trailhead/s as results on the Google Map. Is this possible? I have a google search that will let them search for an address, but this does NOT search within the KML file's data for a trailhead.

Ideally the visitor could input an address, say 12345 Main st., Chicago, IL, or something and it would display results that are within a specified vicinity, say ten miles, of that address (ie latitude, longitude).

I'm a little lost as to even where to begin.

thanks for your help!

Davis

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

I don't know how often your kml file updates, but i recommend storing all the kml data in a database as well to make this easier. Maybe every once in a while re-download the kml file and update the database.

Then its as simple as using the haversine formula and searching the database for nearby trails.

share|improve this answer

What you're describing sounds like a good job for Fusion Tables. Fusion Tables give you a nice way to store and edit the data (even collaboratively). In addition, there are geospatial columns/data fields you can add (aka, a "Location" column that can be address or lat/long coordinates). Put all the trail heads in your fusion table and you can map them. Let people enter an address or lat/long, and you can query the fusion table to show all trail heads within the user specified distance of that point. See the tutorials to get started.

share|improve this answer

You can use KML search tool to do this. It supports KML KMZ CSV and GPX. You can find the tool here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.