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I currently use SVN for a number of things that aren't exactly code, for instance xml files, report templates, miscellaneous files, etc. I have several non-developers who are comfortable using TortoiseSVN for this. They typically work as follows:

  1. Person A - does an SVN Update on the folder of interest to them. Or perhaps just on a single file.

  2. Person A - edits whichever file(s) they're working on. Perhaps add or remove files.

  3. Person B - someone else is probably working on different files at this point

  4. Person A - does an SVN Commit to save their changes to the repository.

Very occasionally they'll hit conflicts where more than one person has edited a file. Almost always this is just because they forgot step #1. Because they're always working on separate files, there are (almost) never real conflicts. As long as they do step #1 first everything works fine.

I'd like to move to Mercurial, however something holding me back is the prospect of having do 'merge' all the time, because Mercurial looks at the state of the entire repository, not just the files of interest at a particular time. e.g. the workflow would be like this:

  1. Person A - does a pull and update on the repository. (let's assume there are no local changes so this is straightforward).

  2. Person A - edits whichever file(s) they're working on. Perhaps add or remove files.

  3. Person B - someone else edits, commits, and pushes a different file at this point

  4. Person A - commits changes. Tries to push. Gets an error about multiple heads.

  5. Person A - does a pull and update. update doesn't work: merge required.

  6. Person A - does a merge. If using TortoiseHg it's a bit confusing working out what to click on to do the merge. I guess this is simpler on the command line, provided there are no complications.

  7. Person A - commits the merge.

  8. Person A - pushes the changes.

My resistance is that there are more steps, and the merge step is somewhat hard to get your head around if you're not a developer. Is there a way I can put these steps together to make the process nice and simple?

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3 Answers 3

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"Very occasionally they'll hit conflicts where more than one person has edited a file. Almost always this is just because they forgot step #1. Because they're always working on separate files, there are (almost) never real conflicts. As long as they do step #1 first everything works fine."

If this is the case why do you want to use a DVCS? Mercurial is great, but the benefits of a DVCS come from the ability to merge and fork and the ease of doing either, if your workflow requires neither why would you want to switch toolset?

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Just because we're moving to mercurial for everything else, so it'd be nice to only have one VCS –  Rory Feb 14 '11 at 10:47
1  
I'm guessing though that you are still talking about two separate communities? One who develops, and the other who edits occasional documents? I tend to find that non-technical people get very easily confused with DVCS - because what used to be a one stage operation (commit), now becomes a two stage operation (commit and push). If all you are thinking of is the support costs, then consider just using two VCS systems for now - or use BoundModeExtension or similar to automate the two stages (or just use bzr which supports both modes). –  cbz Feb 14 '11 at 11:12

Sounds like the rebase extension might work for you. The workflow becomes:

  • hg clone
  • make changes
  • hg commit
  • hg pull --rebase
  • hg push

The local revisions get "rebased" onto the latest tip on pull, which avoids the merge.

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One possible approach is to have a point person who does all the real work of merging. I'm not a big fan of letting everyone push to one shared repos, expecially if they don't know what they are doing. An alternative approach is that A has local repos A, B has local repos B, and there is repos S, which combines A and B. Then, don't let A or B push to S. Instead let an expert pull from A and B, and do the merging in S. Then A and B never have to push to S. If they coordinate with the expert, then he/she will already have merged their changes into S by the time they pull updates from S, and so A and B will not have to merge either when pulling. This is actually the default mode in which DVCS works, since by default all repositories are read-only except by their owner.

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