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I have come across some strange behavior in my iPhone Objective-C app.

I am using some code to test an object:

if (!class_conformsToProtocol([someVar someFunctionThatReturnsAClass], @protocol(MyProtocol)))
     [NSException raise:@"Invalid Argument" format:@"The variables returned by 'someFunctionThatReturnsAClass' Must conform to the 'myProtocol' protocol in this case."];

Oddly, when I have a class that looks like this:

@interface BaseClass : NSObject<MyProtocol>

...

@end

@interface SubClass : BaseClass

...

@end

And when I call this fragment: class_conformsToProtocol([SubClass class], @protocol(MyProtocol)), it returns NO.

Also, this code fails:

class_conformsToProtocol([NSString class], @protocol(NSObject)); // also returns NO

While this code returns YES:

[NSString conformsToProtocol:@protocol(NSObject)];

Is there anything I am missing in the docs? Or is this a bug of some sort? (I am on iOS 4.2 if that matters any).

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1  
Wow, this is interesting... –  Jacob Relkin Feb 11 '11 at 23:08
1  
Not a bug. class_conformsToProtocol() does not inspect superclasses. This is by design, since it's trivial to iterate superclasses. –  Jonathan Grynspan Feb 12 '11 at 0:38
    
It's the same kind of difference as between isKindOfClass vs isMemberOfClass. In this case, you're looking for the conformsToProtocol: method (you can call in on the Class you're getting). –  EthanB Jun 2 '13 at 3:11
    
I actually came here looking for a way to check the conformance of subclasses to a protocol -- ignoring parent class conformance (or vice versa), so thanks for bringing this up! :) –  EthanB Jun 2 '13 at 3:12
    
@ethanB Obviously I knew the proper method to call, as it was in my post, and every other answer :) –  Richard J. Ross III Jun 2 '13 at 3:38
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use NSObject's conformsToProtocol: method.

Here's an experiment I tried:

@protocol MyProtocol

- (void) doSomething;

@end

@interface MyClass : NSObject<MyProtocol>
{
}

@end

@implementation MyClass

- (void) doSomething { 
}

@end

@interface MyOtherClass : MyClass
{

}

@end

@implementation MyOtherClass

- (void) doSomething {
}

@end


int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    MyClass *obj_one = [MyClass new];
    BOOL one_conforms = [obj_one conformsToProtocol:@protocol(MyProtocol)];

    MyOtherClass *obj_two = [MyOtherClass new];
    BOOL two_conforms  = [obj_two conformsToProtocol:@protocol(MyProtocol)];
    NSLog(@"obj_one conformsToProtocol: %d", one_conforms);
    NSLog(@"obj_two conformsToProtocol: %d", two_conforms);

    [pool drain];
    return 0;
}

Output:

obj_one conformsToProtocol: 1
obj_two conformsToProtocol: 1

Whereas:

MyOtherClass *obj_two = [MyOtherClass new];
BOOL conforms_two = class_conformsToProtocol([obj_two class], @protocol(MyProtocol));
NSLog(@"obj_two conformsToProtocol: %d", conforms_two);

Output:

obj_two conformsToProtocol: 0

Verdict:

This is a bug with class_conformsToProtocol, use the conformsToProtocol: method of NSObject

Unlike class_conformsToProtocol, NSObject's conformsToProtocol: method will check superclasses as well.

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If there's a bug here, it's in the documentation.

According to the source, class_conformsToProtocol() uses class_copyProtocolList() and then tests each resulting protocol against the parameter. class_copyProtocolList() is documented as only returning protocols that the given class adopts, but not protocols adopted by superclasses. class_conformsToProtocol() therefore only tests if the given class adopts a protocol and not if its superclasses do.

The documentation bug is that class_conformsToProtocol() doesn't state this behavior. However, the documentation does state that you should generally not use that function, but instead use NSObject's conformsToProtocol: method instead.

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1  
This is interesting, but you hit the nail on the head. Generally you really should never use C functions if there is an Objective-C function that does the same thing. Ex objc_loadModules vs NSBundle –  Chris Thompson Feb 11 '11 at 23:55
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