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I have a program in which the user must make a selection by entering a number 1-5. How would I handle any errors that might arise from them entering in a digit outside of those bounds or even a character?

Edit: Sorry I forgot to mention this would be in C++

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Umm, what programming language? –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 12 '11 at 1:33
    
Sorry I left that part out. C++ is the language. –  Joshua Feb 12 '11 at 1:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Be careful with this. The following will produce an infinite loop if the user enters a letter:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  int i=0;
  do {
    std::cout << "Input a number, 1-5: ";
    std::cin >> i;
  } while (i <1 || i > 5);
  return 0;
}

The issue is that std::cin >> i will not remove anything from the input stream, unless it's a number. So when it loops around and calls std::cin>>i a second time, it reads the same thing as before, and never gives the user a chance to enter anything useful.

So the safer bet is to read a string first, and then check for numeric input:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  int i=0;
  std::string s;
  do {
    std::cout << "Input a number, 1-5: ";
    std::cin >> s;
    i = atoi(s.c_str());
  } while (i <1 || i > 5);
  return 0;
}

You'll probably want to use something safer than atoi though.

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This will do it... Thanks... I'll delete my answer. –  Pepe Feb 12 '11 at 2:16
    
How about wrapping that atoi in a try/catch? –  Steven Sudit Feb 12 '11 at 3:22
    
@SteveSudit: atoi() cannot (should not) throw exceptions since it is a C runtime function. Assuming that this is std::atoi() anyway. atoi does not do anything useful in the case of a non-numeric string. Use something like strtoul instead. –  D.Shawley Feb 28 '11 at 3:47
1  
You should check if the extraction operator fails as well. Enter EOF (Ctrl+D on UN*X, Ctrl+Z on Windows) once if you want to see an infinite loop. –  D.Shawley Feb 28 '11 at 3:51

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