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I have some python code that fails:

import sys
print ("MathCheats Times-Ed by jtl999")
numbermodechoice = raw_input ("Are you using a number with a decimal? yes/no ")
if numbermodechoice == "yes":
    try:
    numberx1 = float(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
except ValueError:
    print ("Oops you typed it wrong")
try:
    numberx1 = float(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
except ValueError:
    print ("Oops you typed it wrong")
    numberx2 = (float)(raw_input('Enter second number: '))
elif numbermodechoice == "no":
    print ("Rember only numbers are allowed")  
    numberx1 = (int)(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
    numberx2 = (int)(raw_input('Enter second number: '))
else:
    print ("Oops you typed it wrong")
    exit()
print ("The answer was")
print numberx1*numberx2
ostype = sys.platform
if ostype == 'win32':
    raw_input ("Press enter to exit")
elif ostype == 'win64':
    raw_input ("Press enter to exit")

(Full code here)

I want to wrap the float operations with try statements so if a ValueError happens, it gets caught. Here is the output:

 File "./Timesed.py", line 23
    try:
      ^
IndentationError: expected an indented block

What is wrong with it and how can I fix this?

share|improve this question
1  
@Senthil: It doesn't help if you correct the code that has the problems in it. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 12 '11 at 2:06
    
@S.Lott Because this new user is probably trying to learn Python, and is probably doing a lot of mistakes. –  Denilson Sá Feb 12 '11 at 2:07
    
You need to provide the exact indentation for each line. Replace all of the tab characters with 8 spaces and reproduce the exact file. you can run python -tt on the script [if you save the text to a script] and it will tell you if you indented properly –  Foo Bah Feb 12 '11 at 2:08
    
We'll need to see the rest of the code as it is in your Timesed.py file. The error that you've shown us seems to be pointing at how you indented that block of code. There are other problems here but we'll be able to better help you if we saw everything. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 12 '11 at 2:16
1  
@Foo: I'm not a mind reader and I shouldn't have to run the code to figure out what the problem is and what the error says now. I can make assumptions on what it might say now, but I'm not going to put words in his mouth. Besides the updated code and grammar fixes, it is exactly as jtl posted and updated. Yeah it's off, but that shouldn't be our problem. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 12 '11 at 3:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Python is whitespace sensitive, with regards to the leading whitespace.

your code probably should be indented like

import sys
from sys import exit
print ("MathCheats Times-Ed by jtl999")
numbermodechoice = raw_input ("Are you using a number with a decimal? yes/no ")
if numbermodechoice == "yes":
    try:
        numberx1 = float(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
        numberx2 = float(raw_input('Enter second number: '))
    except ValueError:
        print ("Oops you typed it wrong")
        exit()
elif numbermodechoice == "no":
    print ("Remember only numbers are allowed")  
    try:
        numberx1 = (int)(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
        numberx2 = (int)(raw_input('Enter second number: '))
    except ValueError:
        print ("Oops you typed it wrong")        
        exit()
else:
    print ("Oops you typed it wrong")
    exit()
print ("The answer was") 
print numberx1*numberx2
ostype = sys.platform
if ostype == 'win32':
    raw_input ("Press enter to exit")
elif ostype == 'win64':
    raw_input ("Press enter to exit")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks It worked!!!!!!!! –  jtl999 Feb 13 '11 at 3:44

In python, the indentation of your code is very important. The error you've shown us points here:

if numbermodechoice == "yes":
    try:
    numberx1 = float(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
except ValueError:
    print ("Oops you typed it wrong")

All code that is part of a block must be indented. By starting a try block, the following line is part of that block and must be indented. To fix it, indent it!

if numbermodechoice == "yes":
    try:
        numberx1 = float(raw_input('Enter first number: '))
    except ValueError:
        print ("Oops you typed it wrong")
share|improve this answer
    
Ok downvoter... I'm calling you out... –  Jeff Mercado Feb 12 '11 at 3:25

You had a wrong syntax. It should be except ValueError: and not except: ValueError. Correct it for you in the question too.

share|improve this answer
4  
I think you should not edit the question that way. You should leave the wrong code in there, so that people won't be confused by your answer. Remember, when editting, you should improve formatting, improve wording... but don't change the meaning! Don't fix a broken code if the question asks why the code is broken! –  Denilson Sá Feb 12 '11 at 2:06
    
@Denilson, point take and I understood the problem with editing the question like I did. Thanks for your note. –  Senthil Kumaran Feb 12 '11 at 6:58

You need to indent the second print statement.

Indentation is important in Python. It's how you delimit blocks in that language.

share|improve this answer

The conversion to float is using an incorrect syntax. That syntax is valid for C/C++/Java, but not in Python. It should be:

numberx1 = float(raw_input('Enter first number: '))

Which will be interpreted like float("2.3"), which is a constructor for the float type being called with a string parameter. And, yes, the syntax is exactly the same for the function call, so you might even think the constructor is a function that returns an object.

share|improve this answer
    
Code still broken –  jtl999 Feb 12 '11 at 2:19
    
Although it's not normal use of python syntax, it's still valid code (the input/conversion). Everything here is first class so it should still be the same, even if we wrap the function names in parens. It's just terrible style to do it this way. Just wanted to make that distinction. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 12 '11 at 2:21
    
Cpde is still broken –  jtl999 Feb 12 '11 at 2:22
1  
-1 In Python (and most other languages), (expression) and expression are equivalent. The conversion to float is using syntax that is unusual and happens to look like a C-etc cast, but it's quite valid Python, and gives exactly the same answer as removing the redundant parentheses, and is NOT the cause of the OP's problem, nor any part of it. –  John Machin Feb 12 '11 at 2:33
    
@John Machin, true! That's a weird syntax that looks like C, but as you say, is still valid! Thanks for pointing that out! –  Denilson Sá Feb 12 '11 at 3:27
import sys

class YesOrNo(object):
    NO_VALUES  = set(['n', 'no', 'f', 'fa', 'fal', 'fals', 'false', '0'])
    YES_VALUES = set(['y', 'ye', 'yes', 't', 'tr', 'tru', 'true', '1'])

    def __init__(self, val):
        super(YesOrNo,self).__init__()
        self.val = str(val).strip().lower()

        if self.val in self.__class__.YES_VALUES:
            self.val = True
        elif val in self.__class__.NO_VALUES:
            self.val = False
        else:
            raise ValueError('unrecognized YesOrNo value "{0}"'.format(self.val))

    def __int__(self):
        return int(self.val)

def typeGetter(dataType):
    try:
        inp = raw_input
    except NameError:
        inp = input

    def getType(msg):
        while True:
            try:
                return dataType(inp(msg))
            except ValueError:
                pass
    return getType

getStr     = typeGetter(str)
getInt     = typeGetter(int)
getFloat   = typeGetter(float)
getYesOrNo = typeGetter(YesOrNo)

def main():
    print("MathCheats Times-Ed by jtl999")

    isFloat = getYesOrNo("Are you using a number with a decimal? (yes/no) ")
    get = (getInt, getFloat)[int(isFloat)]

    firstNum = get('Enter first number: ')
    secondNum = get('Enter second number: ')

    print("The answer is {0}".format(firstNum*secondNum))

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()
    if sys.platform in ('win32','win64'):
        getStr('Press enter to exit')
share|improve this answer
    
The OP is having trouble getting his indentation right. He thinks he needs to cast, like (float)(something). Please consider whether your answer might be way over the top. –  John Machin Feb 12 '11 at 5:48

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