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Say I have already created an iterator called "iter" and an arraylist called "database". I want to be able to look through the arraylist and see if any element in the arraylist is equal to a String called "test". If it is, then I would like to add the element to another list.

while(iter.hasNext()) {
    if(database.next() == test) { 
        database.next().add(another_list);
    }
}

What am I doing wrong? I'm completely new to iterators in java. Do I need to write my own iterator class? Any code examples would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem with your code is that every time you call .next(), it advances the iterator forward to the next position. This means that this code

if(database.next() == test) { 
    database.next().add(another_list);
}

Won't work as intended, because the first call to database.next() will not give back the same value as the second call to database.next(). To fix this, you'll want to make a temporary variable to hold on to the new value, as seen here:

while(iter.hasNext()) {
    /* type */ curr = iter.next();
    if(curr == test) { 
        curr.add(another_list);
    }
}

(Filling in the real type of what's being iterated over in place of /* type */)

In many cases, though, you don't need to use iterators explicitly. Most of the Collections types implement the Iterable interface, in which case you can just write

/* container */ c;
for(/* type */ curr: c) {
    if(curr == test) { 
        curr.add(another_list);
    }
}

Hope this helps!

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The problem with your code is that every time you call .next(), it advances the iterator forward to the next position That's certainly a problem. Additionally, the adding is backwards: should be another_list.add(curr). The foreach loop syntax is for (Type var : col), not "in". –  Mark Peters Feb 12 '11 at 3:21
    
@Mark Peters- Without any type information, it's hard to know if that's correct. Perhaps the container is a collection of Lists? Also, thanks for catching the :/in mishap - I just fixed that. –  templatetypedef Feb 12 '11 at 3:25
    
Unlikely since he's comparing the element to a string for equality. Either way, he said quite clearly that he wanted to add the element to another list, not add another list to the element. I have trouble seeing the ambiguity. Anyway upvoted because you caught the two "next" invocations which is a common problem among Iterator newbies. –  Mark Peters Feb 12 '11 at 3:27
if(database.contains("test"))
{
   another_list.add("test");
}
  1. you can use the built in method contains(...)
  2. you should use equals(...) for data comparisions
  3. look at the javadoc to see if there is already a method present for your purpose
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+1 for using the right tool for the job. –  I82Much Feb 12 '11 at 3:13
    
This is misleading - test is not (necessarily) a string in the poster's question. Perhaps modify it to not be a string? –  nrobey Feb 12 '11 at 3:15
1  
@nrobey: "a String called test..." Now whether or not its value is equal to "test" is a valid point. Should be database.contains(test). –  Mark Peters Feb 12 '11 at 3:17
    
the OP clearly says 'is equal to a String called "test"' –  Pangea Feb 12 '11 at 3:18

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