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Which set is more "random"?

Math.random() for Java or random for Mathematica? Java is in blue, Mathematica in red.

numbers are from 0 to 50 (51?) Mathematica random vs Java

EDIT: It's a histogram generated in Mathematica.

Java Source (ugly)

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        int i = 0;
        int sum = 0;
        int counter = 0;
        String randomNumberList = " ";
        int c = 0;
        while (c != 50){

            while (i != 7) {
            i = (int) (51 * Math.random());
            sum += i;
            ++counter;
            randomNumberList += " " + i;
            }
        i = 0;
        System.out.print("\n" + randomNumberList);
        ++c;
        }

    }

Mathematica source (output.txt is the dump from Java)

dataset = ReadList["~/Desktop/output.txt", Number] 
dataset2 = RandomReal [{0, 50}, 50000]
Histogram[{dataset, dataset2}]

[EDIT]: I was just learning loops when I did the code. Sorry for the confusion. Now I made a cleaner version and they are about equally distributed. I guess that arbitrary loop ending made a big difference.

New mathematica output

new code:

public class RandomNums {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i <= 50000; i++){
        int j = (int) (50 * Math.random());
        System.out.print(j + " ");
        count++;
        if (count == 50){
            System.out.println("\n");
            count = 0;
        }
     }
  }
}
share|improve this question
2  
You will have to explain more about what that graph represents. It looks like it might be a histogram, but it's hard to tell. And please include source code. –  Greg Hewgill Feb 12 '11 at 9:49
1  
How are you generating the numbers? –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 12 '11 at 9:49
5  
"Quality" of randomness requires more than a histogram. You have to look at various series that are generated. There are probably whole books about it. –  Gabe Feb 12 '11 at 9:55
1  
@Gabe: Well said! As a trivial example, I can generate a sequence with a perfectly flat distribution simply using an incrementing modulo counter. –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 12 '11 at 9:57
2  
Why do you have while(i!=7)? I can't tell how many numbers your Java code is generating. Why not just generate 50000 random numbers in a single loop? –  Yaroslav Bulatov Feb 12 '11 at 17:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If this plot suggests anything to me, it is that the quality of Mathematica's uniform random distribution is much better than the implementation in Java you are showing (I don't claim that for any Java implementation. Also, as a disclaimer, and not to start a flame war, I've been both J2EE and Mathematica developer for some time, although admittedly have more experience in the latter).

Here is the argument. You have 50000 points and 50 bins (histogram bars) shown, which suggests that you roughly have 1000 points per bin. More precisely, we can use ergodicity to cast the problem of 50000 uniformly distributed points into that of 50000 independent trials, and ask what is the mean number of points to end up in each bin, and the variance. The probability that any particular bin ends up with exactly k points out of Npoints is given then by a binomial distribution:

enter image description here

For which, the mean is Npoints/Nbins (which is what we expect intuitively, of course), and the variance is Npoints * (1-1/Nbins)* 1/Nbins ~ Npoints/Nbins = 1000, in our case (Npoints = 50000, Nbins = 50). Taking a square root, we get the standard deviation as sqrt(1000) ~ 32, which is about 3% of the mean (which is 1000). The conclusion is that, for an ideal uniform distribution, and for a given number of points and bins, we should expect deviations from the mean of the order of 3%, for each bin. And this is very similar to what Mathematica distribution gives us, judging by the picture. The deviations for individual bins for Java distribution (again, the particular implementation presented here), are much larger, and suggest correlations between bins and that overall this uniform distribution is of much poorer quality.

Now, this is a "high-level" argument, and I am not going into details to discover the reason. This seems logical however, given that the traditional target audience for Mathematica (sciences, academia) is (or at least used to be) much more demanding in this respect, than that for Java. That said, I have no doubts that there exist many excellent Java implementations of random number generators for many statistical distributions - they are just not something built into the language, unlike in Mathematica.

share|improve this answer
    
@Leonid +1 I think one should be able to go for some hypothesys testing (surely controversial) about this. –  belisarius Feb 12 '11 at 13:07
    
@belisarius Well, in any case, that wouldn't be me any time soon :) –  Leonid Shifrin Feb 12 '11 at 13:10
    
@Leonid We should find a scapegoat to blame for not doing that :D –  belisarius Feb 12 '11 at 13:19
    
+1 for "there exist many excellent Java implementations..." - @LQDC - You should check out the Mersenne Twister implementation. It's a pseudorandom number generator with a period of 2^19937 - 1. Check out this article at Wikipedia for more information, as well as various implementations for the algorithm. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mersenne_twister –  JasCav Feb 12 '11 at 16:50
    
Java code uses smaller sample size which gives higher variance to pooled counts. Using WReach's code I get almost identical histograms –  Yaroslav Bulatov Feb 14 '11 at 6:44

Not a direct answer to the question... but anyone who wants to perform some of the "hypothesis testing" suggested by @belisarius in response to @Leonid might find the following code snippet useful to try things out without leaving Mathematica:

Needs["JLink`"]

(* Point to a different JVM if you like... *)
(* ReinstallJava[CommandLine -> "...", ClassPath-> "..."] *)

ClearAll@JRandomInteger
JRandomInteger[max_, n_:1] := JRandomInteger[{0, max}, n]
JRandomInteger[{min_, max_}, n_:1] :=
  JavaBlock[
    Module[{range, random}
    , range = max - min + 1
    ; random = JavaNew["java.util.Random"]
    ; Table[min + random@nextInt[range], {n}]
    ]
  ]

Histogram[
  Through[{JRandomInteger, RandomInteger}[{0, 50}, 50000]]
, ChartLegends->{"Java","Mathematica"}
]

Note that this snippet uses Random.nextInt() instead of Math.random() in an attempt to handle that tricky upper boundary a bit better.

share|improve this answer
    
Incidentally, when I run this code on my machine (MMA 8, Java 6), both distributions are pretty uniform. I don't see the non-uniform behaviour exhibited in the original question. –  WReach Feb 12 '11 at 16:52

Have a look here. It deals with java.util.Random and displays some gotchas. It also recommends using SecureRandom (more expensive, more secure) if you want real-er ( :-) ) randomness.

share|improve this answer

I find a very flat distribution suspicious given is it supposed to be random.

The following code prints what I would expect to see which is, a variation in the count of occurrences due to randomness.

Random : min count 933, max count 1089
Random : min count 952, max count 1071
Random : min count 922, max count 1056
Random : min count 936, max count 1083
Random : min count 938, max count 1063
SecureRandom : min count 931, max count 1069
SecureRandom : min count 956, max count 1070
SecureRandom : min count 938, max count 1061
SecureRandom : min count 958, max count 1100
SecureRandom : min count 929, max count 1068
/dev/urandom: min count 937, max count 1093
/dev/urandom: min count 936, max count 1063
/dev/urandom: min count 931, max count 1069
/dev/urandom: min count 941, max count 1068
/dev/urandom: min count 931, max count 1080

Code

import java.io.*; 
import java.security.SecureRandom; 
import java.util.Random;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String... args) throws IOException {
        testRandom("Random ", new Random());
        testRandom("SecureRandom ", new SecureRandom());
        testRandom("/dev/urandom", new DevRandom());
    }

    private static void testRandom(String desc, Random random) {
        for (int n = 0; n < 5; n++) {
            int[] counts = new int[50];
            for (int i = 0; i < 50*1000; i++)
                counts[random.nextInt(50)]++;
            int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE, max = Integer.MIN_VALUE;
            for (int count : counts) {
                if (min > count) min = count;
                if (max < count) max = count;
            }
            System.out.println(desc+": min count " + min + ", max count " + max);
        }
    }

    static class DevRandom extends Random {
        DataInputStream fis;

        public DevRandom() {
            try {
                fis = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream("/dev/urandom")));
            } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
                throw new AssertionError(e);
            }
        }

        @Override
        protected int next(int bits) {
            try {
                return fis.readInt();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                throw new AssertionError(e);
            }
        }

        @Override
        protected void finalize() throws Throwable {
            super.finalize();
            if (fis != null) fis.close();
        }
    } 
 }
share|improve this answer

With a properly written random code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String randomNumberList = " ";
    for (int c = 0; c < 50000; ++c) {
        // random integer in the range 0 <= i < 50
        int i = (int) Math.floor(50 * Math.random());
        System.out.print(i + " ");
    }
}

I don't see the variance you're talking about

                 *      *                         
  **   * * ** * ***  ** ***  ** *   *  * *   **** 
****** **************** **************************
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Python code to generate the graph:

#!/usr/bin/env python
s = raw_input()
nums = [int(i) for i in s.split()]
bins = dict((n,0) for n in range(50))
for i in nums:
    bins[i] += 1

import itertools
heightdivisor = 50 # tweak this to make the graph taller/shorter
xx = ['*'*(v / heightdivisor) for k,v in bins.items()]
print '\n'.join(reversed([''.join(x) for x in itertools.izip_longest(*xx, fillvalue=' ')]))
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