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I would like to build an immutable tree data structure representing an arbitrary subset of a filsystem directory structure. There would typically be a filter that knows about include/exclude and I would basically want to have some threading support in the construction.

This sounds like pure nerd fun to code myself, but I am actually wondering if there are any good examples, texts or similar on this topic ? Source code is nice ;)

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The first problem you may find is that searching a single disk with multiple threads can be slower than using one thread. As this is the most expensive operation, you need to try this and see what performances best. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 12 '11 at 11:46
    
ALthough I agree, That picture is also changing rapidly in terms of ssd's and similar. On my machine, string tokenizing in wildcard pattern matching is actually heavier than the io part. –  krosenvold Feb 12 '11 at 16:57
    
And on some os'es it will probably be massively faster. Just need to check for the presence of Windows ;) –  krosenvold Feb 12 '11 at 17:00
    
I am not sure what's the goal but the only hard part is collecting the files in multiple threads. I suppose that's an example only (you may have other ideas about the source of the data). But how will a tree be immutable. It can be immutable after it's populated (ok, empty immutable is not an interesting case) –  bestsss Feb 13 '11 at 1:28
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5 Answers

This book has all the answers: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Purely-Functional-Structures-Chris-Okasaki/dp/0521663504

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While it probably has all the answers the book is not really very accessible. It reminds me of books I used to sweat over at university ;) The challenge is not really the structure, but the process of building the structure in a manner that is (preferably) better than the traditional mutable way of handling the problem –  krosenvold Feb 12 '11 at 20:03
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Can you perhaps summarize the content of the book or otherwise explain its contents? Answers that are merely links without explanation are frowned upon at SO. –  Michael McGowan Jan 23 '12 at 19:09
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I dont know whether this is helpful. Java SortedMap uses red black tree and you can look at the source code here.

 https://www.docjar.com/html/api/org/eclipse/ant/internal/ui/dtd/util/SortedMap.java.html

For unmodifiable SortedMap. u can see the source code for Collections.unmodifiableSortepMap here

http://www.docjar.com/html/api/java/util/Collections.java.html
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binary tree is not good for a directory/files structure. –  bestsss Feb 13 '11 at 1:25
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I would suggest maintaining a queue of 'work items'. Each work item encapsulates a directory to explore, and an existing parent node (if any) to attach the resulting tree node to. Each thread executes in a loop, pulling items off the front of the queue, executing them, and pushing any subdirectories onto the end of the queue as new work items.

You start the process by pushing the root directory (with no parent tree node) as the first work item. The process is finished when the queue is empty, and all the threads are idle/waiting.

The above assumes that the tree will be immutable once constructed, but is mutable during construction. If that's not the case, you need to build the tree 'bottom up', so you'll need a temporary, mutable structure to hold nodes as they're being appended to. Otherwise, the process should be the same.

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To krosenvold:

I think that you haven't understood my intention. Maybe I should make myself more clear.

Assumptions are that Tree and TreeBuilder are in the same package.

As you can see Tree constructor and freeze() method have package level access. So you can't create it outside of the package and you can't freeze it outside of package as well.

The only way to do that is via build() method. Only TreeBuilder can create Tree using build method which is synchronized.

Now I even realized that you may even make it simpler removing readonly flag at all and changing Tree.addChild() method to package visibility as well. Hence you will get a tree which has no public mutators only accessors.

Like I said Tree does no synchronization. TreeBuilder is where your synchronization takes place. Have a closer look on the accessors and mutators. Look where public and package modifiers are located and you will see that the only way to modify the tree is when you are in the same package so only tree builder is capable of doing it.

public class Tree<T extends Filterable>{
   private final T data;
   private Tree<T> parent;
   private List<Tree<T>> children;
   private List<FilterChain<T>> filterChain;
   private boolean readonly = false;  
   /*package*/ Tree(T data) {...} 
   /*package*/ Tree(Tree<T> parent, T data) {...}

   /*package*/ void addChild(Tree<T> child){
       children.add(child);
   }
   public List<?> getResults(){
       return data.returnResults(filterChain);
   }

}

public class TreeBuilder<T>{
  public synchronized TreeNode createRoot(T data);
  public synchronized void addSubElement(TreeNode parentNode ,T data);
  public synchronized void addFilter(TreeNode node, Filter<T> filter);
  public Tree<T> synchronized build(){
     Tree<T> tree= ... 
     //build your tree
     //build filter chain for specific tree node
     return tree;
  }

}

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Hi I don't know what exactly would you like to achive especially in terms of thread-safety but maybe below pseudocode could be used as a draft.

public interface Filterable {
     List<?> returnResults(FilterChain chain);
} 

public class Tree<T extends Filterable>{
   private final T data;
   private Tree<T> parent;
   private List<Tree<T>> children;
   private List<FilterChain<T>> filterChain;
   private boolean readonly = false;  
   /*package*/ Tree(T data) {...} 
   /*package*/ Tree(Tree<T> parent, T data) {...}

   //freeze mtd makes object read-only
   /*package*/ void freeze(){         
          readonly = true;
      for(Tree<T> child: children){
          child.freeze();
      }
   }
   public void addChild(Tree<T> child){
       if(readonly){
           throws new NonModifiableException(...);
       }
       children.add(child);
   }
   public List<?> getResults(){
       return data.returnResults(filterChain);
   }

}

Instead of making synchronization on the Tree maybe you could focus on making synchronization on the builder of the tree

public class TreeBuilder<T>{
    public synchronized TreeNode createRoot(T data);
    public synchronized void addSubElement(TreeNode parentNode ,T data);
    public synchronized void addFilter(TreeNode node, Filter<T> filter);
    public Tree<T> synchronized build(){
       Tree<T> tree= ... 
       //build your tree
       //build filter chain for specific tree node
       tree.freeze(); //make your tree readonly
       return tree;
    }
}
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This code is not immutable by a long shot. "Freeze" semantics != immutability –  krosenvold Feb 12 '11 at 16:58
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