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Hey guys, this is nothing serious, but just a question out of curiosity. The following script in JSLINT.com gives a strange and 'unexpected' error. My script works, but I would still like to know if anyone can explain the error.

var hashVar = parseInt(location.hash.replace('#',''), 10);
if(hashVar-0 === hashVar){L();}

ERROR: Problem at line 3 character 4: Unexpected 'hashVar'.

Enjoy the weekend, Ulrik

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2  
What does hashVar-0 === hashVar have to mean? –  jasssonpet Feb 12 '11 at 13:50
    
This: if ( x - 0 ) { foo(); } generates the same type of error. It appears that JSLint does not like x - 0 in the header of if statements... –  Šime Vidas Feb 12 '11 at 13:55
    
Looks like it depends on the 0 , user Number(0) instead. –  Dr.Molle Feb 12 '11 at 14:13
    
hashVar-0 === hashVar mean that hashvar is an int, literally. 109 - 0 = 109, lol - 0 != lol –  Ulrik M Feb 12 '11 at 14:25
    
@Ulrik parseInt() returns either an integer or NaN. Use isNaN() to determine if it's an integer or not. –  Šime Vidas Feb 12 '11 at 14:27
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You probably want this:

var hashVar = parseInt(location.hash.replace('#', ''), 10);
if ( !isNaN(hashVar) ) { L(); } 

This code has the same functionality as your original code.


BTW, this:

if ( !isNaN(hashVar) ) { L(); }

can be further reduced to this:

isNaN(hashVar) || L();

;-)


Explanation:

The return value of parseInt can be:

a) an integer numeric value
b) the NaN value

Therefore, if you want to test whether the return value is an integer or not, just use isNaN().

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Does work, but is there any reason why I would choose this way over the one I posted? Thanks btw. –  Ulrik M Feb 12 '11 at 14:27
    
@Ulrik I've updated my answer with an explanation. –  Šime Vidas Feb 12 '11 at 14:31
    
Thanks, will do. –  Ulrik M Feb 12 '11 at 14:33
    
Avoid the inbuild isNaN & and the inbuild parseInt there a pain with their edgecases. use + and o !== o for parseInt & isNaN instead., –  Raynos Feb 12 '11 at 14:50
    
Edgecases? Explain please Raynos :) –  Ulrik M Feb 12 '11 at 14:54
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