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Is there anyway to get tuple operations in Python to work like this:

>>> a = (1,2,3)
>>> b = (3,2,1)
>>> a + b
(4,4,4)

instead of:

>>> a = (1,2,3)
>>> b = (3,2,1)
>>> a + b
(1,2,3,3,2,1)

I know it works like that because the __add__ and __mul__ methods are defined to work like that. So the only way would be to redefine them?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 71 down vote accepted
import operator
tuple(map(operator.add, a, b))
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4  
I'd say this is the most pythonic solution. – Matthew Schinckel Jan 31 '09 at 1:34
1  
Except that map() is semi-deprecated. See artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=98196 for an article by Guido where it mentions how map is better written as a list comprehension. – Adam Parkin Feb 13 '12 at 21:07
    
It also blows up if a & b don't contain the same number of elements, or aren't "addable" (ex: map(operator.add, (1,2), ("3", "4")) – Adam Parkin Feb 13 '12 at 21:09
12  
tuple([item1 + item2 for item1, item2 in zip(a, b)]) would be the equivalent as a list comprehension. – Adam Parkin Feb 13 '12 at 21:20
    
@Adam Does the list comprehension also evaluate lazily? I'm all for a single way to do things so long as everything is evaluated lazily until I choose otherwise. – Eyal May 24 '12 at 6:47

Using all built-ins..

tuple(map(sum, zip(a, b))
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This seems to be the simpler, superior answer. Why isn't it accepted? – Marc Cenedella Jul 1 '13 at 22:49
14  
it's good, but technically not what's asked for because map returns a list, not a tuple... so: tuple(map(sum,zip(a,b)) – Ben Jan 13 '14 at 3:22
3  
The syntax is mystic. – anatoly techtonik Apr 11 '14 at 8:41

This solution doesn't require an import:

tuple(map(lambda x, y: x + y, tuple1, tuple2))
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1  
This solution is also faster than the other no-import, one-liner solution (map(sum, zip(a, b))) – Air Dec 10 '13 at 0:14

Sort of combined the first two answers, with a tweak to ironfroggy's code so that it returns a tuple:

import operator

class stuple(tuple):
    def __add__(self, other):
        return self.__class__(map(operator.add, self, other))
        # obviously leaving out checking lengths

>>> a = stuple([1,2,3])
>>> b = stuple([3,2,1])
>>> a + b
(4, 4, 4)

Note: using self.__class__ instead of stuple to ease subclassing.

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from numpy import *

a = array( [1,2,3] )
b = array( [3,2,1] )

print a + b

gives array([4,4,4]).

See http://www.scipy.org/Tentative_NumPy_Tutorial

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4  
This will work, but it's a bit heavy to import numpy just for a simple addition operation. – user1239282 Jul 17 '14 at 20:54

All generator solution. Not sure on performance (itertools is fast, though)

import itertools
tuple(x+y for x, y in itertools.izip(a,b))
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simple solution without class definition that returns tuple

import operator
tuple(map(operator.add,a,b))
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Yes. But you can't redefine built-in types. You have to subclass them:

class MyTuple(tuple):
    def __add__(self, other):
         if len(self) != len(other):
             raise ValueError("tuple lengths don't match")
         return MyTuple(x + y for (x, y) in zip(self, other))
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but then you can't use the tuple syntax. – airportyh Jan 31 '09 at 0:59

Generator comprehension could be used instead of map. Built-in map function is not obsolete but it's less readable for most people than list/generator/dict comprehension, so I'd recommend not to use map function in general.

tuple(p+q for p, q in zip(a, b))
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even simpler and without using map, you can do that

>>> tuple(sum(i) for i in zip((1, 2, 3), (3, 2, 1)))
(4, 4, 4)
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