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When is it appropriate to use either the Monitor class or the lock keyword for thread safety in C#?

EDIT: It seems from the answers so far that lock is short hand for a series of calls to the Monitor class. What exactly is the lock call short-hand for? Or more explicitly,

class LockVsMonitor
{
    private readonly object LockObject = new object();
    public void DoThreadSafeSomethingWithLock(Action action)
    {
        lock (LockObject)
        {
            action.Invoke();
        }
    }
    public void DoThreadSafeSomethingWithMonitor(Action action)
    {
        // What goes here ?
    }
}

Update

Thank you all for your help : I have posted a another question as a follow up to some of the information you all provided. Since you seem to be well versed in this area, I have posted the link: What is wrong with this solution to locking and managing locked exceptions?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Eric Lippert talks about this in his blog: Locks and exceptions do not mix

The equivalent code differs between C#4 and earlier versions.


In C#4 it is:

bool lockWasTaken = false;
var temp = obj;
try
{
    Monitor.Enter(temp, ref lockWasTaken);
    { body }
}
finally
{
    if (lockWasTaken) Monitor.Exit(temp);
}

It relies on Monitor.Enter atomically setting the flag when the lock is taken.


And earlier it was:

var temp = obj;
Monitor.Enter(temp);
try
{
   body
}
finally
{
    Monitor.Exit(temp);
}

This relies on no exception being thrown between Monitor.Enter and the try. I think in debug code this condition was violated because the compiler inserted a NOP between them and thus made thread abortion between those possible.

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Which C# version is this? –  smartcaveman Feb 12 '11 at 15:48
    
As I stated the first example is C#4 and the other is what earlier versions use. –  CodesInChaos Feb 12 '11 at 15:51
3  
IMO restoring the shared state is orthogonal to locking/multi-threading. So it should be done with a try-catch/finally inside the lock block. –  CodesInChaos Feb 12 '11 at 16:30
1  
@kizzx2: Such a pattern would be especially nice with reader-writer locks. If an exception occurs within code that holds a reader lock, there's no reason to expect that the guarded resource might be damaged, and thus no reason to invalidate it. If an exception occurs within a writer lock and the exception-handling code does not expressly indicate that the guarded object's state has been repaired, that would suggest that the object may be damaged and should be invalidated. IMHO, unexpected exceptions shouldn't crash a program, but should invalidate anything that may be corrupt. –  supercat Jun 3 '13 at 16:48
1  
@ArsenZahray You don't need Pulse for simple locking. It's important in some advanced multi-threading scenarios. I have never used Pulse directly. –  CodesInChaos Mar 10 at 9:11

lock is just shortcut for Monitor.Enter with try + finally and Monitor.Leave. Use lock statement whenever it is enough - if you need something like TryEnter, you will have to use Monitor.

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A lock statement is equivalent to:

Monitor.Enter(object);
try
{
   // Your code here...
}
finally
{
   Monitor.Exit(object);
}

However, keep in mind that Monitor can also Wait() and Pulse(), which are often useful in complex multithreading situations.

Update

However in C# 4 its implemented differently:

bool lockWasTaken = false;
var temp = obj;
try 
{
     Monitor.Enter(temp, ref lockWasTaken); 
     //your code
}
finally 
{ 
     if (lockWasTaken) 
             Monitor.Exit(temp); 
} 

Thanx to CodeInChaos for comments and links

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In C#4 the lock statement is implemented differently. blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/03/06/… –  CodesInChaos Feb 12 '11 at 15:43

The lock and the basic behavior of the monitor (enter + exit) is more or less the same, but the monitor has more options that allows you more synchronization possibilities.

The lock is a shortcut, and it's the option for the basic usage.

If you need more control, the monitor is the better option. You can use the Wait, TryEnter and the Pulse, for advanced usages (like barriers, semaphores and so on).

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Both are the same thing. lock is c sharp keyword and use Monitor class.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173179(v=vs.80).aspx

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they may have similar functionality but are definitely not same thing... –  Shekhar_Pro Feb 12 '11 at 15:38
3  
Look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173179(v=vs.80).aspx "In fact, the lock keyword is implemented with the Monitor class. For example" –  RobertoBr Feb 12 '11 at 15:43
    
the underlying implementation of lock uses Monitor but they are not the same thing , consider the methods supplied by monitor which do not exist for lock , and the way you can lock and unlock in separate blocks of code . –  eran otzap Jun 3 '13 at 17:07

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