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List<BillOfLading> bolList = new List<BillOfLading>();

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    BillOfLading newBol = new BillOfLading("AXSY1414114");
    bolList.Add(newBol);

    newBol.BillOfLadingNumber = "CRXY99991231";
    bolList.Add(newBol);
}

I was expecting that bolList would container two different objects or values, but it appears that this simple code doesn't work. Any ideas?

Resulting Immediates:

bolList

Count = 2
    [0]: {kTracker.BillOfLading}
    [1]: {kTracker.BillOfLading}
bolList[0]
{kTracker.BillOfLading}
    _billOfLadingNumber: "CRXY99991231"
    BillOfLadingNumber: "CRXY99991231"
bolList[1]
{kTracker.BillOfLading}
    _billOfLadingNumber: "CRXY99991231"
    BillOfLadingNumber: "CRXY99991231"
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It appears to me that the code you wrote matches the output your getting. What is the output you are expecting? –  pmartin Feb 12 '11 at 16:04

2 Answers 2

You've only created one object, and added it twice. The fact that you modified that object between the first and second add is irrelevant; the list contains a reference to the object you added, so later changes to it will apply.

You need to replace newBol.BillOfLadingNumber = ".."; with newBol = new BillOfLading("..");

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I see... That's the key... It contains a Reference to the object I added... hmm.... Is there a way to do this without having to do newBol1, newbol2, etc. (I don't know how many will be added). ? Any ideas ? –  Havingfun Feb 12 '11 at 16:05
    
@Havingfun: You can reuse the same variable - but you need to assign a new value to the variable. –  Jon Skeet Feb 12 '11 at 16:06
1  
Well, you can do bolList.Add(new BillOfLading('xx')); as many times you as you like. –  Flynn1179 Feb 12 '11 at 16:06
1  
This is actually one of those most difficult things to keep track of when you're learning object-oriented programming; being aware of what objects you're creating, and what you're doing with them. There's a LOT of times where you'll create an object almost as a side effect of whatever you're trying to do, and not even notice that it exists; I've lost count of the number of times I've ended up with two or more separated objects representing the same thing, where I should only have one, or been modifying a single object where I should have been creating a new one each time. –  Flynn1179 Feb 12 '11 at 16:13

Flynn1179's answer is correct, but to answer your comment - you don't need a different variable for each object. You can do:

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    BillOfLading newBol = new BillOfLading("AXSY1414114");
    bolList.Add(newBol);

    newBol = new BillOfLading("CRXY99991231");
    bolList.Add(newBol);
}

The important thing to understand is that you're not adding the variable to the list, nor are you adding the object to the list... you're adding the current value of the variable to the list. That current value is a reference to an instance of BillOfLading. In the above code, the list ends up with references to two different objects.

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Thanks ! Way too simple. –  Havingfun Feb 12 '11 at 16:08

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